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OLR Countdown to the Classic Contest

Pick the winner of the 2015 Bassmaster Classic and their total catch weight, rounded to 10ths/lb. (Ex. 40.25 lbs.) The contest winner will receive a fishing tackle package worth over $300. Entry deadline is February 19th. One entry per person. In the event of a tiebreaker, the earliest entry received wins. The winner will be announced on the February 28th airing of "Outdoors with Larry Rea"

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The Show


"Outdoors with Larry Rea" is in its 14th year on the air, broadcasting from Entercom Studios in Memphis, TN. The show's host, Larry Rea, is an expert in Outdoors media, having been the Outdoors Editor for the Memphis Commercial Appeal prior to his move into radio. The show, as well as its website, www.lroutdoors.com, has consistently won awards for excellence in broadcasting, most recently at the annual Southeastern Outdoors Press Association conference. Airing on Saturday mornings, the show features a broad list of segments, including interviews with the most interesting and accomplished Outdoorsmen and women in the U.S. and beyond, but offers a local flavor as well. Larry and his team of show contributors cover the latest news, reports, products and events. In addition to the radio booth, the show hits the road to cover some of the most prestigious events in the industry, such as the Bassmaster Classic, the National Field Dog Trials and more.
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Arkansas increase in several non-resident hunting and fishing licenses

LITTLE ROCK - During last week's meeting of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, Commissioners approved an increase in several non-resident hunting and fishing licenses. The Non-Resident Annual Fishing License will be $50, up from $40. The Non-Resident 3-Day Trip Fishing License will increase from $11 to $16 and the Non-Resident 7-Day Trip Fishing License will increase from $17 to $25.

The Non-Resident Annual All Game license will be increased from $300 to $350. The Non-Resident 1-Day All Game License will now cost $55, the 3-day license will be $125 and the 5-day license will be increased to $180. The Non-Resident Annual Small Game License will be increased from $80 to $110 and the Non-Resident 5-Day Small Game License is $70, up from $55. The new non-resident license fee will go into effect March 1.

The commission also moved forward with the creation of three annual resident licenses for resident outdoorsmen who are 65 and older. The AGFC will petition and work with members of the Arkansas General Assembly and the Bureau of Legislative Research towards the creation of the licenses.

The three potential licenses will be a Resident 65-Plus Annual Fishing License, a Resident 65-Plus Annual Sportsman's Hunting License and a Resident 65-Plus Annual Combination License. The Resident 65-Plus Annual Fishing License will be priced at $3.50, a Resident 65-Plus Annual Sportsman's Hunting License priced at $3.50 and a Resident 65-Plus Annual Combination License priced at $4.50. These proposed licenses will be in addition to the existing AGFC lifetime licenses.
- See more at: http://www.thefishingwire.com/story/337658#sthash.DS0yHObU.dpuf
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Chad Hoover's "That's Knot Right" to Air

Chad Hoover-host of Knot Right Kayak Fishing on NBC Sports and Kayak Bassin' on The World Fishing Network-is one of the most passionate and talented hunters and anglers that you'll ever meet, and one of the funniest and most entertaining personalities in the outdoor industry. But it's a fact that Chad Hoover sees the world from a different perspective than most, which has earned him the nickname 'Knot Right'. Based out of his HOOK1 fishing store in Nashville, TN, That's Knot Right is a reality show that follows the funny-man on his hunting, fishing, and day-to-day adventures in the southeast.

Season 1 of That's Knot Right has 6 episodes. New episodes will be released on CarbonTV every Tuesday morning, starting Tuesday, November 18th.

Watch the trailer and the pilot episode here: http://www.carbontv.com/shows/thats-knot-right/.

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About That's Knot Right: Chad Hoover-host of Knot Right Kayak Fishing on NBC Sports and Kayak Bassin' on The World Fishing Network- sees the world from a different perspective than most, which has earned him the nickname 'Knot Right'. Based out of his HOOK1 fishing store in Nashville, TN, That's Knot Right follows the funny-man on his day-to-day adventures as a father, outdoorsman, and business owner. That's Knot Right is a CarbonTV exclusive series produced by Heliconia.

About Heliconia: Since World Champion kayaker Ken Whiting founded the company in 1998, Heliconia has been a leader in outdoors media production. Heliconia produces 5 outdoor television series that air on NBC Sports, Universal Sports, Outside Television, and The World Fishing Network. See all of Heliconia's work at www.helipress.com, or follow along on Facebook at www.facebook.com/helipress.

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Survey: Fishing Remains a Popular Family Activity

FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — Despite the modern draw of video games and organized sports, the attraction of the wild outdoors and all it has to offer remains as powerful as ever as evidenced by the number of anglers who shared the water with a son, daughter or other child in the past year. Whether spending the day in the comfort of a boat or clutching a rod along a shady bank, fishing remains a popular activity for all ages with up to 66 percent of active anglers reporting they took a child fishing in the past 12 months, according to a recent poll by AnglerSurvey.com. Angling is a great way to enjoy quality one-on-one time with a young person, but it’s also an excellent group activity, too. When asked how many children each angler had taken fishing in the past 12 months, 20 percent said they had taken a single child, while 21 percent took at least two. Nearly 10 percent of anglers reported taking three children fishing, six percent took four and an impressive 10 percent took five or more kids fishing in the past year. Thirty-four percent of those surveyed said they had not taken any children fishing. “Taking a kid fishing is one of life’s more rewarding efforts. Not only is it good for the child and family, it generates a future generation committed to conserving fish and the outdoors,” says Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “We encourage all anglers and the fishing community to get involved in youth fishing efforts and programs such as the RBFF’s Take Me Fishing campaign and others.” Indeed, it looks like an activity that many angling families do enjoy together as 78 percent of those who reported taking a kid fishing said those children were in some way related to them. Forty-four percent were a son or daughter, 17 percent were a grandchild and 17 percent were a niece, nephew or other relative. Twenty-two percent said the child or children they took fishing were not related to them with five percent of those taking them fishing as part of an organized Scouting, church or similar activity. To help continually improve, protect and advance hunting, shooting and other outdoor recreation, all sportsmen and sportswomen are encouraged to participate in the bi-monthly surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and/or AnglerSurvey.com. Every other month, participants who complete the surveys are entered into a drawing for one of five $100 gift certificates to the sporting goods retailer of their choice. About AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com: Launched in 2006, AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com help the outdoor equipment industry, government fisheries and wildlife officials and conservation organizations track consumer activities and expenditure trends. Survey results are scientifically analyzed to reflect the attitudes and habits of anglers and hunters across the United States. Follow them on Facebook at http://facebook.com/huntersurvey and http://facebook.com/anglersurvey or on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/AnglerSurvey and https://twitter.com/#!/HunterSurvey. About Southwick Associates: Southwick Associates is a market research and economics firm specializing in the hunting, shooting, sportfishing, and outdoor recreation markets. Founded in 1989, Southwick Associates is renowned for delivering comprehensive insights and statistics assisting business and strategic decisions across the entire outdoor industry; from government agencies, industry associations and non-profit organizations, to affiliated businesses and manufacturers. Aside from custom market research, and economic impact studies, Southwick also provides syndicated participation, media consumption, and equipment purchase tracking studies utilizing their three proprietary sportsmen panels. Visit www.southwickassociates.com for more information.
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Survey: Hunters Still Enjoy Small Game and Upland Hunting

FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — With more than 10 million hunters pursuing the white-tailed deer in the United States, according to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, this iconic creature reigns supreme as the most hunted species of game animal in North America. Walk by the newsstand in the fall and glance at the covers of outdoor magazines and it would seem deer and other big game are virtually all that is of interest. But that perception would be wrong. In fact, according to a recent study by HunterSurvey.com, about half of sportsmen surveyed said they had hunted small or upland game in the past year. Species such as squirrels, rabbits, quail, pheasants and similar furred and feathered game still draw hunters into our nation’s fields and forests by the millions every year. “Small game and upland hunting often served as a hunter’s first experiences pursuing game before deer, turkey and elk populations became so plentiful; and for many hunters, they still are. With abundant opportunities available to hunt various small game and birds, it would seem interest among many sportsmen is still there,” says Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “For those not pursuing small game, by promoting such hunting we may be able to help expand their hunting opportunities and fun, and thereby increase overall hunting activity.” And what is the type of firearm of choice for these small game hunters? HunterSurvey.com found the low-recoiling rimfire in either .22 caliber or .17 caliber remains a favorite among these sportsmen with 67 percent of those surveyed reporting they used them when hunting. Shotguns remain tops for bird hunting, to no surprise. To help continually improve, protect and advance hunting, shooting and other outdoor recreation, all sportsmen and sportswomen are encouraged to participate in the bi-monthly surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and/or AnglerSurvey.com. Every other month, participants who complete the surveys are entered into a drawing for one of five $100 gift certificates to the sporting goods retailer of their choice. About AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com: Launched in 2006, AnglerSurvey.com, HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com help the outdoor equipment industry, government fisheries and wildlife officials and conservation organizations track consumer activities and expenditure trends. Survey results are scientifically analyzed to reflect the attitudes and habits of anglers and hunters across the United States. Follow them on Facebook at http://facebook.com/huntersurvey and http://facebook.com/anglersurvey or on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/AnglerSurvey and https://twitter.com/#!/HunterSurvey. About Southwick Associates: Southwick Associates is a market research and economics firm specializing in the hunting, shooting, sportfishing, and outdoor recreation markets. Founded in 1989, Southwick Associates is renowned for delivering comprehensive insights and statistics assisting business and strategic decisions across the entire outdoor industry; from government agencies, industry associations and non-profit organizations, to affiliated businesses and manufacturers. Aside from custom market research, and economic impact studies, Southwick also provides syndicated participation, media consumption, and equipment purchase tracking studies utilizing their three proprietary sportsmen panels. Visit www.southwickassociates.com for more information.
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2015 GEICO Bassmaster Classic Field Is Nearly Filled

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — The GEICO Bassmaster Classic — the Super Bowl of Bass Fishing — is not only a must-attend festival for fishing fans, but it is also the crown jewel in a professional angler’s career.
 
For some, just qualifying for the most prestigious event in bass fishing is a dream come true. For others, being in the field is the next step in building a career as a pro. And for the fortunate few who have won it, it is the crowning achievement of a career.
 
Feb. 20-22, 56 anglers will converge in Greenville, S.C., to compete for the title of Bassmaster Classic champion and a share of the $1 million purse. Fifty-five of those qualifiers have been determined. The remaining slot will be filled during the Toyota Bonus Bucks Bassmaster Team Championship to be held on Lake DeGray, Arkansas, Dec. 9-13.
 
The 2015 Bassmaster Classic returns to Lake Hartwell, having been previously contested on the border impoundment between South Carolina and Georgia in 2008. That year, Alton Jones of Lorena, Texas, claimed victory in dramatic fashion.
 
Recently at the 2014 Old Milwaukee B.A.S.S. Nation Championship held on the Ouachita River, Connecticut competitor Paul Mueller bested the rest of the field by a significant margin, taking home the Bryan V. Kerchal Memorial Trophy and his second berth in the Bassmaster Classic. At last year’s Classic, Mueller weighed in a whopping three-day total of 66 pounds, 8 ounces for a second-place finish in his first Classic.
 
Mueller, who represents the Eastern Division of the B.A.S.S. Nation, will be joined by two other repeat qualifiers from 2014 — Coby Carden of Alabama and Jeff Lugar of Virginia. Three Classic rookies qualified through the championship as the highest finishers within their respective divisions: Teb Jones of Mississippi, Steve Lund of Arizona and Troy Diede of South Dakota.
 
Thirty-one Bassmaster Elite Series pros earned their slots through the Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year standings. Headlining that list is 2014 Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year Greg Hackney of Gonzales, La. He earned that title in September at the Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year Championship on Bays de Noc at Escanaba, Mich.
 
Along with the yearly points qualifiers, seven other anglers qualified by winning an Elite Series event in 2014 and Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Opens pro Jacob Wheeler qualified by winning the inaugural BASSfest. Along with those win-and-you’re-in berths from the Elite Series, seven anglers from the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Opens presented by Allstate also earned the same distinction by winning an event in their division. Two Opens division spots were rolled to the Elite Series points because the champions did not meet the requirement of fishing the entire three-tournament division.
 
In addition, Brett Preuett of the University of Louisiana at Monroe qualified for the Classic through the Carhartt Bassmaster College Series Championship and Classic Bracket competition.
 
All told, with double qualifiers included, the Top 40 pros from the Elite Series and Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year standings have qualified for the 2015 Bassmaster Classic.
 
The competitors will take off daily from the newly renovated Green Pond Landing facility on Hartwell near Anderson, S.C., and daily weigh-ins will be held in Greenville, S.C., in the state-of-the-art Bon Secours Wellness Arena. The ever-popular Bassmaster Classic Outdoors Expo presented by Dick’s Sporting Goods will be held at the 260,000-square-foot TD Convention Center, also in Greenville.
 
Here are a few interesting facts about the 2015 Bassmaster Classic:
 
The 2015 championship marks the first time in 24 consecutive runnings of the event that four-time Classic champion Kevin VanDam will not be in the field. His absence ends his pursuit of Rick Clunn’s record 28 consecutive Bassmaster Classic appearances.
 
For the first time, two “defending champions” will be in the field together. Each year, the angler who won the previous year’s Bassmaster Classic earns an automatic berth into the next year’s event. This year, not only will the 2014 champion Randy Howell be in the tournament, but 2013 winner Cliff Pace — who was granted an exemption for a serious injury shortly before the 2014 Classic — will also be in the field.
 
In addition to Pace and Howell, five other former Classic champions have qualified: Mark Davis (1995), Michael Iaconelli (2003), Chris Lane (2012), Takahiro Omori (2004) and Skeet Reese (2009).
 
Six Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year title-holders will be competing on Lake Hartwell, including Hackney, Davis (1995, 1998 and 2001), Iaconelli (2006), Aaron Martens (2005 and 2013), Reese (2007) and Gerald Swindle (2004).
 
The up-to-date list of 2015 Bassmaster Classic qualifiers as of Nov. 8, 2014 is below:

Casey Ashley
Donalds, S.C.
10th place, AOY

Stephen Browning
Hot Springs, Ark.
Winner, Bassmaster Open
 
Coby Carden
Shelby, Ala.
B.A.S.S. Nation Southern Division
 
Jason Christie
Park Hill, Okla.
Winner, Elite Series event

Keith Combs
Huntington, Texas
6th place, AOY
 
John Crews
Salem, Va.
19th place, AOY

Cliff Crochet
Pierre Part, La.
24th place, AOY
 
Mark Davis
Mount Ida, Ark.
5th place, AOY

Ott DeFoe
Knoxville, Tenn.
winner, Bassmaster Open

Troy Diede
Sioux Falls, S.D.
B.A.S.S. Nation Northern Division
 
Paul Elias
Laurel, Miss.
23rd place, AOY

Edwin Evers
Talala, Okla.
22nd place, AOY

Todd Faircloth
Jasper, Texas
2nd place, AOY

Shinichi Fukae
Palestine, Texas
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Greg Hackney
Gonzales, La.
1st place, AOY

Matt Herren
Ashville, Ala.
16th place, AOY

Brett Hite
Phoenix, Ariz.
Winner, Elite Series event

Randy Howell
Springville, Ala.
2014 Classic champion

Michael Iaconelli
Pitts Grove, N.J.
Winner, Elite Series event

Teb Jones
Hattiesburg, Miss.
B.A.S.S. Nation Central Division
 
David Kilgore
Jasper, Ala.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Bobby Lane
Lakeland, Fla.
33rd place, AOY

Chris Lane
Guntersville, Ala.
Winner, Elite Series event

Brandon Lester
Fayetteville, Tenn.
28th place, AOY

Jared Lintner
Arroyo Grande, Calif.
8th place, AOY

Bill Lowen
Brookville, Ind.
32nd place, AOY

Justin Lucas
Guntersville, Ala.
11th place, AOY

Jeff Lugar
McGaheysville, Va.
B.A.S.S. Nation Mid-Atlantic Division
 
Steve Lund
Glendale, Ariz.
B.A.S.S. Nation Western Division
 
Aaron Martens
Leeds, Ala.
4th place, AOY

Mike McClelland
Bella Vista, Ark.
Winner, Elite Series event

Andy Montgomery
Blacksburg, S.C.
35th place, AOY

Chad Morgenthaler
Brandon West, Mo.
18th place, AOY

Paul Mueller
Naugatuck, Conn.
B.A.S.S. Nation Eastern Division
 
James Niggemeyer
Van, Texas
27th place, AOY

Takahiro Omori
Emory, Texas
38th place, AOY

Cliff Pace
Petal, Miss.
2013 Classic champion

Brandon Palaniuk
Hayden, Idaho
17th place, AOY

Chad Pipkens
Holt, Mich.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Cliff Pirch
Payson, Ariz.
36th place, AOY

Jacob Powroznik
Prince George, Va.
Winner, Elite Series event

Brett Preuett
Monroe, La.
Carhartt College Series Classic qualifier

Cliff Prince
Palatka, Fla.
40th place, AOY

Skeet Reese
Auburn, Calif.
7th place, AOY

Dean Rojas
Lake Havasu City, Ariz.
 9th place, AOY

Scott Rook
Little Rock, Ark.
21st place, AOY

Morizo Shimizu
Osaka, Japan
30th place, AOY

Kevin Short
Mayflower, Ark.
39th place, AOY

Van Soles
Haines City, Fla.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

Brian Snowden
Reeds Springs, Mo.
34th place, AOY

Gerald Swindle
Warrior, Ala.
14th place, AOY

Randall Tharp
Port St. Joe, Fla.
13th place, AOY

David Walker
Sevierville, Tenn.
20th place, AOY

Jacob Wheeler
Indianapolis, Ind.
Winner, BASSfest

Andrew Young
Mound, Minn.
Winner, Bassmaster Open

About B.A.S.S.
B.A.S.S. is the worldwide authority on bass fishing and keeper of the culture of the sport. Headquartered in Birmingham, Ala., the 500,000-member organization’s fully integrated media platforms include the industry’s leading magazines (Bassmaster and B.A.S.S. Times), website (Bassmaster.com), television show (The Bassmasters on ESPN2), social media programs and events. For more than 45 years, B.A.S.S. has been dedicated to access, conservation and youth fishing.
 
The Bassmaster Tournament Trail includes the most prestigious events at each level of competition, including the Bassmaster Elite Series, Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Open Series presented by Allstate, B.A.S.S. Nation events, Carhartt Bassmaster College Series, Bassmaster High School Series, Toyota Bonus Bucks Bassmaster Team Championship and the ultimate celebration of competitive fishing, the GEICO Bassmaster Classic presented by Diet Mountain Dew and GoPro.
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Richmond and Drozd are Discipline Athletes of the Year

In a year that included historic results for USA Shooting's shotgun program, it is only fitting that the two athletes that earned this season's biggest prize be honored as USA Shooting's Athletes of the Year. Double Trap World Champion Josh Richmond and Skeet World Champion Brandy Drozd are this year's honorees. Richmond and Drozd were recognized Monday with the discipline athletes of the year for Rifle, Pistol and Paralympic set for release Tuesday.

Josh Richmond, 2014 Athlete of the Year
On September 13, recognition so bold as Athlete of the Year would not have been in the realm of possibility for U.S. Army Sergeant First Class Josh Richmond (Hillsgrove, Pennsylvania), a member of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit. But, one day later, fate would change when Richmond set aside months of frustration and doubt and climbed to the top of the shotgun world yet again.

All the glory, the accolades, the hype and the magazine cover shoot, those are nice. But to really distinguish yourself in sport, there are days you just have to show up to work and prove that your one of the best. Richmond won a world title in Double Trap and did just that.

It speaks to Richmond's prowess in the sport when two World Cup silver medals (Tucson & Almaty) and a fourth-place finish at Nationals might be considered a down year. But he admitted as much after Granada. "I told the coaches (Todd Graves and Dwayne Weger) that I was stumbling. I had two months where I couldn't find anything and nothing worked. I was putting maximum rounds down range but was really disappointed with my shooting. I had no confidence."

But he discovered something during an early practice round when no bird came out of the bunker on one of his calls. He felt it instantly. "I was pushing the gun really bad and Todd and I both looked at each other and decided that we were going to let the targets come up and then chase after them. As complex of a game as this is, that's the only thing I needed to switch."

Richmond became World Champion for the third time, repeating the title he won in 2010 and earning the USA Shooting Team's first Olympic quota spot in the process. He won a Junior World title back in 2005. The performance also ensured that the world's foremost Double Trap team of Richmond, Glenn Eller and Jeff Holguin would continue its remarkable run of glory as the world's foremost Double Trap team. To close out his year, Richmond finished fourth at the World Cup Finals in Gabala, Azerbaijan.

Richmond is now a two-time recipient of the award having done so previously in 2010 after also winning a world title.

Brandy Drozd, 2014 Athlete of the Year
Distinction in the skeet discipline is vexing at best. Distinguishing oneself doesn't come easy when you compete alongside the reigning two-time Olympic champion Vincent Hancock and a shotgun matriarch in Kim Rhode. Good thing for Brandy Drozd (Bryan, Texas), distinction finds you when you work hard enough and accomplish much.

That's what happened this year as the 20-year-old Drozd rose up from relative junior obscurity and claimed her spot among a prominent mix. For such, she's the 2014 USA Shooting Athlete of the Year. She began the year by earning a spot on the World Team and subsequent World Cups during Spring Selection. She then went to Tucson and finished fourth, just missing a medal following a shoot-off with Kim Rhode. She'd again lose a shoot-off to Rhode in World Cup action in Munich, but this time it was in the gold-medal match as she claimed the second World Cup medal of her career following a bronze-medal in 2012. In a preview of things to come, she'd earn a gold medal at the Spain Grand Prix in Granada, defeating teammate Haley Dunn.

Early season success did much to raise the confidence of this Texas native, but so too did work ethic, composure beyond her years, and steely determination. Those ingredients came together nicely this September on her way to winning the World Championships. Drozd beat Great Britain's Elena Allen to claim the title and also an Olympic quota spot for the USA Shooting Team in this event. Drozd earned the gold medal by defeating Allen 14 hits to 13 and thus adding to a season that has shown her true potential.

Nobody has been happier to see it than Hancock. "I've shot with her for several years now and I've seen her coming up and I knew that she was going to be something special," Hancock said, "just the way that she goes out there and competes - it reminds me a lot of me. It's a lot of fun to watch somebody when they're on top of the world like that. Talking to her, you would never know that she is such a fiery competitor. She comes out to beat absolutely everybody, guys included. She has to up her game for Kim (Rhode), especially - all of our girls do - and that goes to show how good our skeet program is getting in the U.S."

Rhode, rightfully so, will be the marquee storyline for the USA Shooting Team as Rio approaches. But in her own event and with the added incentive of sending two women to the Olympic Games in both shotgun disciplines for the first time, a new story has emerged in Drozd. After a brilliant 2014 campaign, the eyes of Texas, America and world are upon her.

ELEYELEY is a Proud Sponsor of the USA Shooting Rifle and Pistol Teams: ELEY Limited, manufacturer of the world's most consistently accurate rimfire ammunition, has been the Official Sponsor and Official Supplier of .22 rimfire ammunition of the USA Shooting rifle and pistol teams since 2000. For more information on ELEY and their products, please visit eley.co.uk.

Winchester Ammunition is a Proud Sponsor of the USA Shooting Shotgun Team: Winchester® Ammunition has been the exclusive ammunition sponsor and supplier of the USA Shooting Shotgun Team since 1999. Members of the past two shotgun teams brought home a combined six medals from London and Beijing using Winchester AA International Target loads. Winchester is an industry leader in advancing and supporting conservation, hunter education and our country's proud shooting sports heritage. For more information about Winchester and its complete line of products, visit winchester.com.
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Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever Forms to Revive State Bird in Tennessee
Public lands management, private lands restoration outline chapter goals

Cookeville, Tenn. – January 7, 2014 – Tennessee residents are making a positive impact for wildlife habitat conservation with the formation of the state’s newest Quail Forever chapter. Officially known as the Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever, the group is committed to restoring the pastime of quail hunting in Tennessee through habitat improvements.

“Our goal is to rehabilitate the bobwhite quail so our children and grandchildren can see this amazing bird,” said Clinton Kennedy, elected president for the Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever. “The tradition of quail hunting has a special place in Tennessee’s heritage. By working with partners in the state, our chapter wants to ensure a bright future for bobwhites and other wildlife.”

The formation of the Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever comes at a crucial time for quail conservation efforts in the state. The state recently completed the Tennessee Northern Bobwhite Quail Restoration Plan, and the chapter has already contacted staff of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) to offer assistance with quail habitat projects on several of the state’s Wildlife Management Areas (WMA’s). Public hunting properties that are being considered for future management by the Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever include Pea Ridge WMA, Bridgestone/Firestone WMA, Cordell Hull WMA, and Jackson Swamp WMA.

In addition to public land conservation efforts being provided by the new chapter, Quail Forever and its state partners are also focusing on private lands restoration in the region with the recent hiring of David Peters, Farm Bill wildlife biologist. Peters’ main role will include working with farmers and landowners to deliver conservation planning on a landscape level to improve wildlife habitat throughout his assigned area in Tennessee. “I am excited about the opportunity to work with the Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever,” said Peters. “By working together on both public and private lands, we have an opportunity to make a tremendous impact for wildlife.”

“This is an incredible example of conservation groups and state agencies working in tandem to protect natural resources and renew a long-standing tradition in Tennessee,” said Andy Edwards, Quail Forever’s regional representative in Tennessee. “The new Quail Plan put forth by the TWRA has residents excited about the future opportunities to restore bobwhite numbers. Our volunteers are making a huge difference for upland conservation, and I look forward to assisting with the efforts of our new chapter.”

Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever

The Upper Cumberland Chapter of Quail Forever has elected Clinton Kennedy of Cookeville as president and Lindsey Silvey of Bloomington Springs as treasurer.

For more information about the chapter or to become involved, please contact chapter president, Clinton Kennedy, at (931) 303-2776 / email.

Quail Forever in Tennessee

Tennessee’s 10 Quail Forever chapters account for 1,122 members statewide. Those chapters have spent over $100,000 to complete 341 habitat projects since the first Tennessee chapter formed in 2007. Those projects have improved nearly 2,000 acres for wildlife. For more information regarding Quail Forever in the state or to start a local chapter, contact Andy Edwards, regional representative in Tennessee at (931) 638-9478 / email.


About Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever

Pheasants Forever, including its quail conservation division, Quail Forever, is the nation's largest nonprofit organization dedicated to upland habitat conservation. Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever have more than 140,000 members and 700 local chapters across the United States and Canada. Chapters are empowered to determine how 100 percent of their locally raised conservation funds are spent, the only national conservation organization that operates through this truly grassroots structure. Since creation in 1982, Pheasants Forever has spent $508 million on 475,000 habitat projects benefiting 10 million acres nationwide.

Quail Forever is dedicated to the conservation of quail, pheasants and other wildlife through habitat improvements, public awareness, education and land management policies and programs.

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Ducks Unlimited welcomes Gator-Tail
Outboards as new corporate partner


MEMPHIS, Tenn. – Jan. 16, 2015 – Ducks Unlimited (DU) is pleased to welcome Gator-Tail Outboards as the organization’s newest corporate partner. Gator-Tail Outboards is one of Ducks Unlimited's newest corporate partners.Headquartered in Loreauville, La., Gator-Tail outboard motors are the original belt-driven, surface-drive mud motors and are made in the USA. Gator-Tail Outboards deliver speed and quality and are the only outboard motor on the market with an instant reverse option. In 2015, Gator-Tail will offer a 25 horsepower Ducks Unlimited edition featuring a blacked out color and matte finish. Each motor will be assigned a limited edition serial number stamped on a stainless steel plate resembling a waterfowl band on the side of the belt-housing. The motors will also feature Gator-Tail and Ducks Unlimited decals. “We’re excited to work on this project with Gator-Tail”, said DU’s Director of Corporate Relations Jeremy Smith. “Mud motors are growing in popularity with waterfowl hunters, and DU is fortunate to have the opportunity to capitalize on this momentum with one of the biggest names in the industry.” Gator-Tail Outboards is working to have the limited edition motors ready this spring. “Obtaining the DU license was very important as it allows us to make a significant impact on waterfowl conservation with the sale of each unit,” said Gator-Tail Outboards owner Kyle Broussard. “Ducks Unlimited’s membership and support base consists of avid sportsmen and waterfowlers who rely on quality gear and equipment in the field. Our products will certainly live up to their expectations.”
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Bass Pro Names Manager at new Memphis Pyramid Megastore

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — David Hagel has been named store manager for the new Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid store, which opens May 1 in Memphis, Tennessee.  Hagel has been the store manager for the Bass Pro Shops Sportsman’s Warehouse store located on Macon Road in Memphis for the past 12 years.  
“Growing up in this area, I know that residents and visitors alike have dreamed of standing at the top of the Memphis Pyramid,” said Hagel.  “I am absolutely thrilled to be part of the team making this dream come true.”
Johnny Morris, founder of Bass Pro Shops, has said the Bass Pro Shops Pyramid store is “one of the most dynamic, immersive retail destination stores in the world.”  At 535,000 square feet, it will be one of the largest retail stores in the world under one roof, and one of the company’s largest investments to date.  
In addition to vast assortments of outdoor gear, the new mega store will feature many diverse, unique features including an interactive national Waterfowling Heritage Center in partnership with Ducks Unlimited; the popular Uncle Buck’s Fishbowl and GrillBig Cypress Lodge—a 100-room grand hotel; 600,000 gallons of water features; a cypress swamp with 100-foot-tall trees; and the largest free-standing elevator in America—25 stories and open all four sides. 
“For the first time, the public will be able to travel up 300 feet to the apex of the Pyramid, stand on cantilevering glass-floored outdoor observation decks, and take in sprawling riverfront views,” said Hagel.  “It’s the little things done right that add up to big rewards and excitement.”
Hagel went on to say that the Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid store will offer fishing, boating, camping, hiking, and hunting gear, and the largest assortment of waterfowl and related hunting equipment ever assembled.
“It makes sense for waterfowling to play a huge role in our store’s features since we’re situated on the Mississippi Flyway,” said Hagel.   He noted that the Waterfowling Heritage Center will be an interactive wetlands and waterfowl education museum showcasing the history of waterfowling and wetlands conservation.
A local native, Hagel enjoys spending time outdoors with his family and hunting, fishing, golfing, and boating.  He has a passion for the outdoors that he wants to share with Bass Pro Shops visitors and customers.
“I am looking forward to helping area youth and adults get involved in outdoor activities that will help educate and create a lasting foundation that in turn can be passed on to generations to come,” he said.
The store will offer free outdoor skills workshops throughout the year for adults, kids and families that will help maximize outdoor fun by teaching new skills and improving existing ones.
“Customers come to Bass Pro Shops for the best of everything—product selection, prices, world class customer service and the experiential element our stores offer.”  
Nationally, Bass Pro Shops will host more than 120 million people visiting their 90 stores and marine centers across America and Canada this year.  The average customer stays 2 ½ hours and drives an average distance of 50+ miles.  Bass Pro Shops was named by Advertising Age magazine as one of the Top 10 Hottest Brands in America along with name brands such as Old Spice, M&M’s, iPad and Droid.  Also, Bass Pro Shops has been recognized numerous times for their conservation and outdoor education efforts.
“Bass Pro Shops is the leader in the retail outdoor recreation industry, but, in addition, we work closely with our conservation partners to help protect and promote those outdoors resources,” said Hagel.
Since the beginning, Bass Pro Shops founder Johnny Morris has been dedicated to inspiring people, especially youth and families, to love, enjoy and conserve the great outdoors. That commitment, demonstrated over the course of several decades, is a big reason why Bass Pro Shops is known as the outdoor industry’s corporate conservation leader. Bass Pro Shops has partnered with and supports the efforts of many organizations that work to conserve and manage the nation’s natural resources. The company’s key conservation initiatives include fish and wildlife habitat improvements, conservation and outdoor skills education, improving water quality and quality of our lakes and springs, and conservation advocacy.
A special Evening for Conservation event to help benefit area conservation groups will take place the night before the official grand opening.  This event demonstrates Bass Pro Shops dedication to conservation and exhibits will highlight the important work conducted by local conservation groups.  For every dollar spent during the Evening for Conservation, 50 cents will be donated to a designated group.  In addition, the event will feature celebrities, entertainment and a ribbon-cutting ceremony.  The event is free and open to the public. Information regarding the Evening for Conservation will be available at a later date.
A job fair will be held in February where applications and on-site interviews will be available for individuals who are interested in working at the new mega outdoors store.  Hagel will lead a team of approximately 600-plus associates from the area who promote the outdoor lifestyle and live it as well.
“We will work hard to hire individuals who have a great knowledge of the area, and a love of the outdoors, so our customers will be able to get everything they need for their outdoor experience,” said Hagel.  “All departments will have individuals with years of experience in their field standing ready to help our customers when they walk through those front doors.”
 “I’m proud of the city of Memphis, the people, and the history,” said Hagel.  “In addition, I’m proud to be part of a company that allows us to be part of so many community efforts, store events, local conservation projects, and national initiatives. I’m very much looking forward to working with both of these elements–I believe we’ll create such a sensation that people will come from not just this area, but across the country to experience.”
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Arkansas Outdoors


AGFC approves non-resident license increase
 
LITTLE ROCK – During last week’s meeting of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, Commissioners approved an increase in several non-resident hunting and fishing licenses. The Non-Resident Annual Fishing License will be $50, up from $40. The Non-Resident 3-Day Trip Fishing License will increase from $11 to $16 and the Non-Resident 7-Day Trip Fishing License will increase from $17 to $25.

The Non-Resident Annual All Game license will be increased from $300 to $350. The Non-Resident 1-Day All Game License will now cost $55, the 3-day license will be $125 and the 5-day license will be increased to $180. The Non-Resident Annual Small Game License will be increased from $80 to $110 and the Non-Resident 5-Day Small Game License is $70, up from $55. The new non-resident license fee will go into effect March 1.

The commission also moved forward with the creation of three annual resident licenses for resident outdoorsmen who are 65 and older. The AGFC will petition and work with members of the Arkansas General Assembly and the Bureau of Legislative Research towards the creation of the licenses.

The three potential licenses will be a Resident 65-Plus Annual Fishing License, a Resident 65-Plus Annual Sportsman’s Hunting License and a Resident 65-Plus Annual Combination License. The Resident 65-Plus Annual Fishing License will be priced at $3.50, a Resident 65-Plus Annual Sportsman’s Hunting License priced at $3.50 and a Resident 65-Plus Annual Combination License priced at $4.50. These proposed licenses will be in addition to the existing AGFC lifetime licenses.

In other business, the commission:
* Approved grants of youth elk hunting permits (either sex) for the Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation and the Arkansas Wildlife Federation. The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation also received an either-sex permit. The permits are for fundraising purposes and will be used during the 2015 elk season.
*Approved a resolution of encroachments involving property adjacent to Lake Overcup in Conway County.
*Approved providing legal defense representation on behalf of an AGFC wildlife officer involved in a lawsuit.
*Approved the purchase of 95 vehicles to replace high-mileage, damaged and outdated equipment. Total cost of the replacement vehicles is just over $2.3 million.
*Agreed to acquire 1,377 acres adjacent to the Mike Freeze Wattensaw Wildlife Management Area from the Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation. The area is known as the Robinwood Tract. Total cost of the purchase was just over $2.3million. The amount will be paid over three years.
*Heard a presentation on the state’s black bear harvest. Just over 350 bears were harvested in the 2014 season. That number was up from 288 bears in 2013.
Bald eagle shot at Bayou Meto; recovery likely
 
HUMPHREY – Enforcement officials with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission are looking for a person who shot and wounded a bald eagle Monday on Bayou Meto Wildlife Management Area.
The juvenile eagle was quickly taken to a rehabilitator and probably will recover. Rodney Paul of Central Arkansas Raptors Rehab at El Paso in White County said, “This eagle was shot in the right wing ...resulting with a fractured right ulna. The steel pellet is going to remain in the wing. It will not affect the healing process.
Karen Rowe, nongame migratory bird coordinator with AGFC, said, “While it is likely that a duck shooter shot the eagle, it was a pair of true sportsmen, duck hunting conservationists who fished the eagle out of the water, wrapped the eagle in a hunting coat, put the eagle in their boat and called the wildlife officers to meet them at the boat ramp.”
Rowe suggested donations to the rehabilitation facility to help with expense of care for the injured eagle. She said, “Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas is the nonprofit raptor rehab facility that will spend its own money and time caring for this eagle until it can be released. You can make a PayPal donation help pay for the care of this eagle and other raptors at http://www.rrca-raptors.org/.
Heavy penalties and jail sentences can be assessed to anyone shooting a bald eagle. Information can be provided anonymously to the AGFC by phone at 800-482-9262 or by text to TIP411 (847411) or contact Special Agent Jason Keith with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement in Little Rock at 501-324-5643.

UAPB class introduces students to outdoor recreation
 

PINE BLUFF – Most Arkansans cut their teeth on hunting, fishing, canoeing and other outdoor endeavors through teaching by parents or perhaps grandparents. For a few dozen students at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, these introductions come in a classroom.

They learn to cast a fishing lure, to tie a hook to a line, to paddle a canoe, to shoot an arrow from a bow. And they do these things to meet the requirements of Professor LaTraia Jones’ Outdoor Recreation course, a junior-senior level offering at UAPB.

Jones quietly confides that his students are not the only ones learning new activities in the class. He learns as well. “Everyone was pulling out cell phones and taking photos when I climbed into a canoe,” he said.

Jones makes considerable use of a resource close to the UAPB campus – the Gov. Mike Huckabee Delta Rivers Nature Center of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. The facility’s staff often lends a hand with teaching specific skills in addition to offering a place where students can practice what they learn in the classroom. Walking the trail at the center is regular feature, enlivened a bit when a snake is on the trail.

AGFC Boating Education cards are issued after students complete several segments of the course, and one student made use of this on a visit to the Gulf Coast. Jones said, “He wanted to rent a Jet Ski, and they asked, ‘Do you know how to operate this’? He pulled out his card from our class and waved it at them.”

These Boating Education cards have another purpose. They are items for adding on a student’s resume when seeking employment.

Jones said, “We have had 15 of our graduates go to work for the National Park Service. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department will be at our career day this year to talk to students about internships.”

This semester, the Outdoor Recreation class has 38 students, larger than usual. But Jones said he can manage it with the help of Eric Maynard, Brett Crow and other staffers at the Pine Bluff nature center.

Maynard said, “You’ve got 38 students. We can handle them in archery here at our place. We’ve got indoor space for archery.”

Jones said, “Don Scott learned archery in our class last year. He is 6’2”, 300 pounds, and now he has taken up bow hunting.” Another student, Thomas Hass, has become an enthusiastic fisherman as well as getting into duck hunting since he studied Outdoor Recreation.
AGFC working to repair slide on Lake Overcup dam
 
MORRILTON – Drivers traveling south on Highway 95 along Lake Overcup may have noticed what appears to be a slide on the back side of the Lake Overcup dam. Inspections by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission have determined that the integrity of the dam has not been compromised.

The dam has a history of slides dating back to 1987. AGFC District Fisheries Supervisor Tom Bly says the agency is currently working with consulting engineers to determine the cause, extent and remedial action that can be taken to address the problem. “A precursory inspection by the consulting engineers revealed no seeps on the downstream slope or tension cracks along the slope intercept. Bulges at the toe of the dam indicate the slide may not be as deep-seated as earlier feared,” Bly explained.

The clay foundation of the dam was exposed in several places in the slide, Bly says. “This is consistent with using borrowed soil from onsite to construct the backside embankment over the clay foundation. The nature of the soils themselves may be the cause of the problem. The consulting engineers will be conducting borings and soil testing, analyzing the data and developing recommendations,” he said.

Bly said the AGFC is hoping that a drawdown of the lake is not needed when repairs are made. “We have discussed this numerous times with our engineer and administration. We do not want to draw the lake down unless it is absolutely necessary,” he said. “We lowered the lake in 2010 as part of a management drawdown. We made several improvements during the drawdown including marking the boat trails, renovations to facilities and liming the lake to improve water quality,” Bly said. “We also repaired a slide on the dam during the drawdown. Due to ensuing drought years and the renovation of the water control structure and drain pipe, it took longer than usual for the lake to recover and fill up. Though fish population sampling did not indicate adverse effects to the fish population due to the extended drawdown, it did appear to affect fishing,” he added.

AGFC personnel will continue to monitor the slide while preparations are made to initiate the repairs. “Due to the nature of the work, it will be summer before repairs can be made. Once the consulting engineers complete their study we will develop cost estimates off their recommendations,” Bly explained.

Lake Overcup is a 1,025-acre fishing lake that was impounded in 1963. It is located in Conway County about a mile north of Interstate 40 and the city of Morrilton.
AGFC stocks over 172,000 fish during December
 
LITTLE ROCK – Arkansas anglers have had a respite from the cold over the past week. They’ve taken advantage of the warm weather to hit the state’s numerous fisheries.

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission fisheries crews have been busy stocking those fisheries with over 172,000 fish in Arkansas lakes and rivers.

The total stocking weighed over 54,700 pounds. Sportfish stocked included trout, largemouth bass, crappie, bream and catfish.

December’s stockings:
Amon’s Lake, Baxter County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Atalanta, Benton County, 1,864 catchable rainbow trout
Beaver Lake, Benton County, 30,000 yearling channel catfish
Lake Bentonville, Benton County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Bennett Lake, Faulkner County, 10,000 fingerling redear bream
Boyle Park Pond, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Cabot Community Pond, Lonoke County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Cargile, Conway County, 5,824 yearling white crappie
Carol Ann Cross Park, Sebastian County, 700 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Catherine, Garland County, 1,360 catchable rainbow trout
Cherrywood Lake, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Conway Station Park, Faulkner County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Craighead Forest Kids Pond, Craighead County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Dieffenbacher, Miller County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Entergy Park Lake, Garland County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Family Park Lake, Garland County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Fort Roots Lake, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Hamilton, Garland County, 2,030 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Jack Nolen, Sebastian County, 2,704 yearling white crappie
John Benjamin Glenwood Community Pond, Pike County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Little Missouri River, Montgomery County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
MacArthur Park Lake, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Martin Luther King Jr. Park Pond, Jefferson County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
Mike and Janet Huckabee Youth Pond, Hempstead County, 250 catchable rainbow trout
Mirror Lake, Stone County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
Murphy Park Lake, Washington County, 750 catchable rainbow trout
Little Missouri River, Pike County, 5,475 catchable rainbow trout
Ouachita River, Hot Spring County, 2,000 catchable rainbow trout
Paradise Lake, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Pleasant View Park Pond, Pope County, 1,200 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Pickthorne, Lonoke County, 533 catchable channel catfish
Lake Rayburn, Benton County, 2,504 fingerling black crappie
Rich Mountain Community College Pond, Polk County, 300 catchable rainbow trout
Rock Creek, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Saline River, Grant County, 5,888 yearling white crappie
Searcy City Lake, White County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Sherwood City Pond, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Spring River, Fulton County, 4,420 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Springdale, Washington County, 750 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Valencia, Pulaski County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
War Memorial Park, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Welles, Sebastian County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
West Memphis City Park Lake, Crittenden County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
White River, Baxter County, 13,500 fingerling rainbow trout
White River, Baxter County, 13,500 fingerling brook trout
Greers Ferry National Fish Hatchery Little Red River, Cleburne County, 4,750 fingerling brook trout
Little Red River, Cleburne County, 4,750 fingerling rainbow trout
Little Red River, Cleburne County, 6,985 catchable rainbow trout
Little Missouri River, Pike County, 2,640 catchable rainbow trout
North Fork River, Baxter County, 13,500 fingerling brook trout
Lake Hamilton, Garland County, 5,090 catchable rainbow trout
Norfork National Fish Hatchery Beaver Tailwater, Carroll County, 2,499 catchable rainbow trout
North Fork River, Baxter County, 2,042 catchable rainbow trout
White River, Baxter, Izard and Marion counties, 36,203 catchable rainbow trout
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JOHN BERRY FISHING REPORT 1/23/2015

During the past week, we have had no rain, warmer temperatures and moderate winds. The lake level at Bull Shoals fell three tenths of an inch to rest at four and three tenths feet below seasonal power pool of 659 feet. This is forty and three tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Upstream, Table Rock remained steady at five and five tenths feet below seasonal power pool and twenty one and five tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Beaver Lake fell one tenth of a foot to rest at six and five tenths feet below seasonal power pool or sixteen and one tenth feet below the top of flood pool. On the White, we had brief periods of heavy generation in the morning and afternoon with some wadable water. Norfork Lake fell one tenth of a foot to rest at three and two tenths feet below seasonal power pool of 553.7 feet and twenty nine and four tenths feet below the top of flood pool. On the Norfork, we had wadable water every day with generation most mornings.
 
The water level for the top of power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes on this system are well below seasonal power pool.
 
The Catch and Release section below Bull Shoals Dam will close from November 1, 2014 to January 31, 2015 to accommodate the brown trout spawn. The State Park will be seasonal Catch and Release for the same period. All brown trout must be immediately released. In addition, night fishing is prohibited in this area during this period.
 
On the White, the hot spot was the State Park. The hot flies were olive woolly buggers (#8, #10), Y2Ks (#14, #12), prince nymphs (#14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead #16, #18), pheasant tails (#14), ruby midges (#18), root beer midges (#18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (#10), and sowbugs (#16). Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective (try a flashback beadhead pheasant tail nymph with a ruby midge or red fan tail midge suspended below it). Egg patterns have been very effective.
 
Conventional wisdom states that hopper fishing ends with the first frost (we had several heavy frosts this past week). I reject this idea and fish them during the winter. I favor shorter leaders (seven and a half foot 3X) and a stiff six weight rod to proper deliver these weighty flies. My favorite flies are Dave’s hoppers (#10) and the western pink lady (#8). To increase hook ups I always use a dropper. I am currently using a ruby or root beer midge in size eighteen on a three foot or longer tippet (depending on the depth of the water I am fishing).
 
The higher flows on some mornings and afternoons have been conducive to fishing large streamers. You need a fast sinking sink tip line and an eight weight or better rod. This is a heavy lift that requires casting skills and patience.
 
The Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek have cleared and are navigable. With the colder weather, the smallmouths are not active. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.
 
 
The Norfork River has fished poorly recently. With the warmer weather there was more fishing pressure on the Norfork.  The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (#18, #20, #22)  like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (#14, #16) like the green butt. Egg patterns have also been productive. Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead headed nymph (zebra midge, copper John or pheasant tail) suspended eighteen inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise #10). There have been reliable hatches of small midges (try a size 24 Adams parachute) and caddis (try a size 18 elk hair caddis).The fishing is better in the morning and late afternoon and tapers off midday.
 
There was little fishing pressure on Dry Run Creek despite the warmer weather. It has been a great time to fish there. The hot flies have been sowbugs (#14), Y2Ks (#12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise #10). While you are there take a few minutes to visit the adjacent Norfork national Fish Hatchery. It is fascinating. Be sure and remove your waders before entering to prevent the spread of aquatic diseases. Take a break from time to time to keep your youngsters warm. Bring some cocoa!
 
The water on the Spring River has cleared some. This is a great place to wade fish, when they are running water on the White and Norfork Rivers. Canoe season is over and there are fewer boats on the river to interfere with your fishing. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive woolly buggers with a bit of flash (#10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (#10) and Y2Ks (#10).
 
Remember that the White and Norfork Rivers and Dry Run Creek are infected with didymo, an invasive alga. Be sure and thoroughly clean and dry your waders (especially the felt soles on wading boots) before using them in any other water. Many manufacturers are now making rubber soled wading boots that are easier to clean and are not as likely to harbor didymo.
 
Don’t forget to sign up for my fly tying class at Arkansas State University Mountain Home beginning February, 5 and make plans to attend the White River Chapter of Trout Unlimited Annual Fund Raiser at the Elks Club on February, 7.
 
John Berry is a fly fishing guide in Cotter, Arkansas and has fished our local streams for over thirty years.    
 
 
 
 
TROUT UNLIMITED FUND RAISING BANQUET COMING UP
BY JOHN BERRY
The Annual Fund Raising Banquet for the White River Trout Unlimited Chapter #698 is scheduled for Saturday February, 7 2015 at the Elks Club. The Elks club is located at Highway 62 and Buzzard Roost Road in Mountain Home, Arkansas. The doors open at 5:30 PMand the live auction begins at 7:00 PM. Tickets are $35.00 for an individual or $50.00 for a couple. You can purchase your tickets at Dally’s Ozark Angler, Rivertown Gallery and the Two Rivers Fly Shop. They can also be purchased on the TU website,http://www.whiterivertu.com. For those who have never attended, this is the social event of the year. My wife, Lori, and I have a severe case of cabin fever and we are ready for a night on the town.
 
There is a cash bar and a light buffet. In the past, there was a sit down dinner but I think the light buffet works out a lot better. It allows for more mobility and social interaction. There is also music and dancing. This seems to be the only place where I get to dance with Lori. We both enjoy it.
 
The live auction is always a hit with plenty of quality items. The donated artwork is always spectacular. There are always some great guide trips to bid on. There is a silent auction with items for everyone. Lori always finds something nice there.
 
The question is always, what do they do with the money they raise? The White River Trout Unlimited Chapter # 698 is an incredibly active organization that concentrates on education and conservation for our local streams. They have a large base of volunteers but require funding for their projects.
 
They have two major education projects and both are directed to children. They are the future conservationists in our area. My favorite is their Annual Summer Youth Camp. This is held at the Norfork National Fish Hatchery. This is a fun and fact filled time that is truly enjoyed by the participants. They learn about the trout’s life cycle, entomology, fly tying, fly casting and fly fishing. It is done in a casual atmosphere and includes plenty of time on the water. There trout in the classroom is geared toward providing aquariums for local schools to give our students a unique look at aquatic environments.
 
Their conservation projects are first rate. My favorite is the Bonneville Cutthroat trout stocking project. We are in the third year of a five year program where we annually stock Bonneville Cutthroat trout eggs in Whitlock Vibert boxes in Catch and Release sections of the White and Norfork Rivers. The idea is to develop a sustainable strain of trout that will spawn in our rivers and offer a diversity of wild trout. This could make a very positive impact on our trout fisheries. They also have a commitment to help fund bank stabilization projects to help prevent the siltation of our trout streams.
 
If you want to have a good time and also help a conservation organization that is having a positive impact in our area, join me at the White River Trout Unlimited Fund Raising Banquet.
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TWRA News

TWRA SETS 2014-15 WINTER TROUT STOCKING SCHEDULE

NASHVILLE --- The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has announced its 2014-15 winter trout stocking scheduled. TWRA plans to release approximately 90,000 rainbow trout into Tennessee waters from December through March.
The program provides numerous close to home trout fishing opportunities for anglers during the winter months. These fisheries also provide a great opportunity to introduce children or first-time anglers to fishing.
The trout will average about 10 inches in length. The daily creel limit is seven, but there is no size limit.
Please note that the dates and locations are subject to change. Updates can be found on TWRA’s website at www.tnwildlife.org.
2014-15 TWRA Winter Trout Stocking Schedule
December 2014
Day                  Location                                              City
2                      Tuesday           Shelby Bottoms Park                           Nashville
2                      Tuesday           Sulphur Fork Creek                             Springfield
3                      Wednesday     Cumberland Mt. State Park                Crossville
3                      Wednesday     West Fork Stones River                      Murfreesboro
4                      Thursday         Lafayette City Park                            Lafayette
4                      Thursday         Marrowbone Lake                               Joelton
5                      Friday              Lake Graham                                      Jackson
5                      Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                        Nashville
9                      Tuesday           Cameron Brown Lake                         Germantown
9                      Tuesday           Edmund-Orgill Park                           Millington
9                      Tuesday           Shelby Farms                                      Memphis
9                      Tuesday           Johnson Park Lake                              Collierville
10        Wednesday     Martin City Pond                                            Martin
10        Wednesday     Union City Old Reelfoot Packing Site           Union City
10        Wednesday     Paris City Park                                                Paris
10        Wednesday     McKenzie City Park                                       McKenzie
10        Wednesday     Cane Creek Park                                             Cookeville
10        Wednesday     Stone Bridge Park                                           Fayetteville
10        Wednesday     Billy Dunlop Park                                           Clarksville
11        Thursday         Kingston Springs Park                                    Kingston Springs
11        Thursday         J.D. Buckner Park                                           Dickson
11        Thursday         Davies Plantation and Yale Road Park          Bartlett
11        Thursday         Munford City Park                                         Munford
12        Friday              Nice Mill                                                         Smyrna
12        Friday              Harpeth River                                                 Franklin
12        Friday              McCutcheon Creek                                         Spring Hill
16        Friday              Beech Lake                                                     Lexington

January 2015  

  2        Friday              Oneida City Park                                            Oneida
2        Friday              East Fork Shoal Creek                                    Lawrenceburg
2        Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                                    Nashville
6        Thursday         Lake Junior                                                     Nashville
8        Thursday         Lake Graham                                                  Jackson
9        Friday              Nice Mill                                                         Smyrna
13        Tuesday           Cameron Brown Lake                                     Germantown
13        Tuesday           Shelby Farms                                                  Memphis
13        Tuesday           Johnson Park Lake                                          Collierville
14        Wednesday     Beech Lake                                                     Lexington
14        Wednesday     McKenzie City Park                                       McKenzie
14        Wednesday     Martin City Pond                                            Martin
14        Wednesday     Union City Old Reelfoot Packing Site           Union City
14        Wednesday     Paris City Park                                                Paris
15        Thursday         Munford City Park                                         Munford
15        Thursday         Davies Plantation and Yale Road Park          Bartlett
15        Thursday         Big Rock Greenway                                       Lewisburg
16        Friday              Duck River at Fisherman’s Park                     Shelbyville
16        Friday              Duck River at Riverside Dam                         Columbia
20        Tuesday           Cowan City Park                                            Cowan
21        Wednesday     Cane Creek Park                                             Cookeville
22        Thursday         Shelby Bottoms Park                                      Nashville
23        Friday              McCutcheon Creek                                         Spring Hill
23        Friday              Harpeth River                                                 Franklin          
29        Thursday         Lafayette City Park                                        Lafayette
30        Friday              West Fork Stones River                                  Murfreesboro
30        Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                                    Nashville

February 2015

 4         Wednesday     Sulphur Fork Creek                                         Springfield
5         Thursday         Billy Dunlop Park                                           Clarksville
5         Thursday         Stone Bridge Park                                           Fayetteville
6         Friday              Nice Mill                                                         Smyrna
11        Wednesday     Lake Junior                                                     Chattanooga
12        Thursday         Pickett Lake, Pickett State Park                     Jamestown
12        Thursday         Kingston Springs Park                                    Kingston Springs
12        Thursday         J.D. Buckner Park                                           Dickson
13        Friday              Marrowbone Lake                                           Joelton
19        Thursday         Cowan City Park                                            Cowan
20        Friday              McCutcheon Creek                                         Spring Hill
20        Friday              Harpeth River                                                 Franklin
26        Thursday         Big Rock Greenway                                       Lewisburg
27        Friday              Percy Priest Tailwaters                                    Nashville

March 2015

 4                     Wednesday     Sulphur Fork Creek                             Springfield
6                     Friday              Nice Mill                                             Smyrna
11                    Wednesday     East Fork Shoal Creek                        Lawrenceburg
13                    Friday              Duck River at Riverside Dam             Columbia
19                    Thursday         Shelby Bottoms Park                           Nashville
19                    Thursday         Cowan City Park                                  Cowan
20                    Friday              McCutcheon Creek                              Spring Hill
20                    Friday              Harpeth River                                      Franklin


SARP CELEBRATES DECADE OF AQUATIC HABITAT CONSERVATION

Accomplishments and Successes Detailed in Newly Released Anniversary-Edition Report
NASHVILLE – Shafts of early morning sun filter through forest cover in the Appalachian Highlands. The sunlight catches a glint of swirling line as an angler casts for brook trout in a recently restored stream.
A tiny rush darter finds improved habitat among the riffles and eddies of a restored creek in
Winston County, Alabama where excessive sedimentation once placed it in peril of being listed
as an endangered species. The creek has one of the last surviving populations of rush darters in
the world.

A freshwater mussel has been found in a restored section of Raccoon Creek, Georgia, making a
rare reappearance after years of absence. While not yet endangered, the mussel, a harbinger of
water quality, hasn’t been seen in the creek for years.

The low grumble of an engine and the sound of lapping waves signals the arrival of anglers
looking for a black bass in a backwater area of the lower Arkansas River where a sediment
barrier has recently been removed, reconnecting fish and anglers to a much-loved fishing hole.

Paddling past a restored spring now reconnected to Florida’s Hillsborough River, a kayaker
surprises a manatee drawn to the fresh free-flowing water.

These are just a few success stories in a decade-long regional effort in the Southeastern United States, led by the Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP) to preserve globally significant aquatic species and the habitats they need to survive before they are lost forever. In 2004, 14 state fish and wildlife agencies signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that acknowledged their official SARP membership and participation to leverage resources and expertise to strengthen conservation of fish and other aquatic resources. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has been a SARP partner since its inception. The conservation vision of Gary Myers, former Director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, SARP was established, “to do for fish what the North American Waterfowl Management Plan did for ducks.” In the 1980s when waterfowl populations plummeted to record lows, the governments of Canada and the United States developed a strategy to restore waterfowl populations through habitat protection, restoration and enhancement. With the support and involvement of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (SEAFWA), the National Fish Habitat Partnership, and a variety of federal agencies, councils and commissions, conservation organizations and businesses, SARP has served as a successful catalyst and network builder for habitat restoration, conservation and scientific research in the southeastern United States.   

These accomplishments and featured habitat conservation case studies, including Duck River water quality and habitat improvements are recognized in a recently released 10-year anniversary report titled, "Conserving Fish Habitat From the Rivers to the Sea: The Story of the Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership.” This report can be read in its entirety by visiting
http://www.southeastaquatics.net/resources/sarps-special-reports/conserving-fish-habitat-from-rivers-to-the-sea-the-story-of-the-southeast-aquatic-resources-partnership-1/view.

For more information about SARP's partners, programs and conservation successes, please visit
SARP on the Web at www.southeastaquatics.net or contact Lindsay Gardner, SARP Program &
Communications Manager at lindsayg@southeastaquatics.net.
The mission of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is to preserve, conserve, manage, protect, and enhance the fish and wildlife of the state and their habitats for the use, benefit, and enjoyment of the citizens of Tennessee and its visitors. 
The Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP) will, with partners, protect, conserve and restore aquatic resources, including habitats throughout the Southeast, for the continuing benefit, use and enjoyment of the American people. SARP’s collaborative, regional, multi-agency approach galvanizes the efforts of state and federal agencies, conservation organization and businesses to conserve aquatic habitats from whitewater to bluewater, from rivers to the sea. To learn more about SARP visit www.southeastaquatics.net.

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Winter Crappie Fishing Is Heating Up

JACKSON – The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) Fisheries Bureau reports that crappie fishing has picked up on several lakes.  Anglers are catching crappie by trolling with jigs or minnows in open water at Lake Lincoln State Park near Wesson and fishing jigs around boat docks and piers at Eagle Lake in Warren County.
 
“Crappie, along with other game fish, move deeper during the winter and often suspend in open water making them easy to see on a depth finder,” said MDWFP Fisheries Biologist, Jerry Brown.  “Fishing slowly with small minnows or small jigs at 10-12 foot depths is a popular method of catching crappie during this time of the year,” added Brown.
 
Winter fishing tips are posted for lakes across the state on the Fishing Reports tab on the MDWFP website and provide anglers with winter fishing tips.                                                                                   
For more information regarding fishing in Mississippi, visit our website at www.mdwfp.com/ or call us at 601-432-2212. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter atwww.twitter.com/MDWFPonline.


Men Found Guilty of Headlighting Deer

JACKSON—Michael Shane Uzzle Jr., 19, of Vicksburg, and Ricky Breland, 20, of Redwood,  were found guilty Wednesday in Warren County Justice Court of headlighting deer.  Uzzle pled guilty to two counts of headlighting and was fined $10,382 after serving 10 days in the Warren County Jail. Additionally, his right to hunt, fish, and trap is forfeited for two years. He is currently under a one year license forfeiture for the illegal harvest of a paddlefish in 2014 at which time he was fined $2,500.
 
Breland pled guilty to one count of headlighting and was fined $4,492 after serving 30 days in jail. His right to hunt, fish, and trap is forfeited for one year.
 
Uzzle and Breland were arrested on the night of Dec. 14, 2014, along Highway 465 in Warren County and by a MDWFP Conservation Officer with assistance from the Warren County Sheriff’s Office.
 
“We are pleased with the court’s ruling,” MDWFP Chief of Law Enforcement Col. Steve Adcock said. “Apprehending those who headlight has been and will continue to be a priority for our law enforcement officers."
 
To report wildlife and fisheries violations call 1-800-BE-SMART
For more information contact James Walker at 601-432-2400. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDWFPonline.
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Clagett Talley Pickwick Lake Fishing Report

Pickwick Lake Elevation 413.96
Water Temp. 50

BASS 
Rain has the lake and river muddy and pretty tough right now. I have been on a few fishing trips above and below the Dam lately and while some trips have produced big fish and a few small ones to go with it, some trips have not produced any bass at all but we are likely to catch some other species. Old grassy areas in the lake are still producing good fish at times although the grass is pretty much dies down right now. Texas rigged Strike King Rage Tail in pumpkin seed and green pumpkin Coffee Tubes have accounted for most of the fish we have caught in these areas. Black has been a good color for me as well as green pumpkin. The weather will make bass fishing tough over the next few weeks but this is still a time where you are likely to catch the biggest fish of the year. 
Stripers 
I am not doing any striper fishing trips right now mainly because this is just a slow time of the year for them. If I was to take someone striper fishing right now I would depend on a deep diving crankbait to keep the trip interesting. Although I know you can have a good day on live bait and jigs drifting right now, but I would not try it first.
Catfish
After talking to a few catfishermen while I was on a sauger fishing trip I was told that catfishing has slowed down a lot. The water from all the rain has muddied the river and really made it hard on all species right now below the dam. Most catfishermen are using worms bought out of bait stores in deep water.
Sauger
I love to eat sauger like everyone else but it has been a little slow over the last couple of weeks. I have been fishing with a plastic grub on a sauger jig bouncing it in fifty feet of water.
Compliments of Clagett Talley 731-607-5266
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Gary Harlan Pickwick Lake Fishing Report

Pickwick
February fishing forecast
1/18/2015
Water temp: low to mid 40’s
Clarity:  2’-6’ depending where you are

 

I have been catching up on things around Casa de Harlan and haven’t been on the water in a few weeks so I am relying on my trusted sources for the up to date information….As of today’s date: there is a major shad kill going on right now, the water temps are low and there is a major shad kill going on. But now is not the time to despair! Now is the time to catch some big ones providing you are willing to brave the cold. The Pickwick winter trail yesterday (1/17) had 2 sacks over and one near 26lb.  There were 2 fish over 8lb weighed in. Alabama rigs, Big Swimbaits and Jigs are all you need right now. Big single swimbaits (like the 5.5 and 6.5 Shadalicious) fished deep and slow will put a gorilla in your boat. My favorite bait this time of year is the jig. I use a Denny Brauer Structure jig in ½ or ¾ oz weights and a Rage Craw or Denny Brauer Magnum Chunk as a trailer. I work these in and around current breaks and steep drops. Most of the time you never feel the bite, so you need to pay close attention and when you think you are fishing slow….Slow down some more and be very thorough when fishing structure or cover.
I have heard from some sources at TVA (nothing official has been released) that they will bring the lake back up this year. This will start in mid to late March. There are more urgent issues further up the river that TVA is going to be focusing on. PTL!
The Crappie are still biting, however with the shad kill I would wait a few weeks before trying them again. They like the bass will want a bait deep and slow. We are booking up fast for this spring /summer. If you want a specific day I would suggest you get in touch with us as soon as possible to reserve your date. We appreciate all the support in 2014.  Be safe out there cold water kills!

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Steve McCadams Kentucky Lake Fishing Report

ANGLERS RIDE WAVES OF WEATHER PATTERNS

By Steve McCadams

 

    Kentucky Lake’s fall fishing scene this week started off with above average temperatures and mellowed out at midweek but the weekend forecast indicates a dose of winter weather may enter the picture. In fact, a big change in temperatures is already in progress.

    From windy, warm and wet to cold, crisp mornings; that’s what anglers have encountered this week as it has been a roller coaster of conditions. In-between the extremes were a few days of nice normal weather and both crappie and bass fishermen took advantage of it.

    Lake levels this week slept around the winter pool mark and haven’t fluctuated much. Elevation for the weekend will be in the 354.8 range at Kentucky Dam. Upstream at New Johnsonville lake levels will be in the 354.6 range. Water color remains clear.

    Surface temperatures warmed slightly to start the week off in the 67 degree range but cooled to 65 at midweek. Watch for a two or three degree drop by the weekend as the cold front will pull surface temps back into the low 60’s.

    Crappie fishing was fair this week but anglers had to battle more wind than they bargained for. Fall isn’t normally a season of unstability but it seems conditions have rotated with one or two nice days each week sandwiched in-between several days of unruly weather. 

    A few good size fish were taken in 8 to 12 foot depths and some had even moved up to 6 to 7 foot depths in the Paris Landing sector. A few boats were still working main lake ledges at times and finding some scattered fish in 10 to 14 foot water but windy days kept a lot of boats off main lake areas where whitecaps were dancing.

    Jigs tipped with Berkley crappie nibbles seem to be the bait of choice, although some fish were opting or live minnows at times.

    The overall crappie bite lately has been a bit off as numbers have been a bit below average. On days when light winds and cloud cover were present the fishing improved.

    Bass fishermen are still finding enough action to keep them interested but that too has been a bit below average as the bass have been sluggish as have the crappie.

    Some topwater action was underway in the early mornings and late afternoons as fish moved up on shallow gravel banks in hot pursuit of shad. Shallow running crankbaits were still productive on rocky points and along gravel as were some suspending jerk baits.

    A few bass were showing up in the backs of bays where aquatic vegetation was present. Some schooling activity was taking place and anglers tossing rattle trap style lures and some spinnerbaits were scoring.

    Grassbeds are still abundant along the main river shorelines and island rims. Bass are still relating to the grass too.

    A few boats continue to toss big crankbaits, Carolina rigs and Alabama rigs, and jig and pig combos on drop-offs as well.

    Although a drastic weather change will put a chill in the air this weekend, it appears mild weather will return by early next week as temps are expected to rebound back to the mid to upper 60’s soon.

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Ducks Unlimited News

DU celebrates more than 5 million acres conserved in the United States
Major milestone means more habitat for waterfowl and opportunities for hunters

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – Dec. 2, 2014 – In a major win for wetlands and waterfowl conservation, the U.S. Senate passed the Duck Stamp Act of 2014 today. This critically important conservation legislation increases the cost of the federal duck stamp from $15 to $25, and now awaits President Obama’s signature.

“With the assistance of Sen. David Vitter and his leadership in helping pass the Duck Stamp Act of 2014, much-needed funding has been secured for wetlands and waterfowl conservation,” said Ducks Unlimited CEO Dale Hall. “The additional duck stamp funding provided by waterfowl hunters and other conservationists will not only conserve critical waterfowl habitat, but will also help ensure the future of our waterfowling traditions.”

Since 1991 – the last time the price of the duck stamp was increased – its purchasing power has declined due to inflation and rising land costs. The Duck Stamp Act of 2014 would build on this program’s long tradition of helping to conserve vital waterfowl habitat across America, especially in the Prairie Pothole Region, one of the continent’s most important production areas.

“This is huge news for conservation and duck hunters,” said Sen. Vitter of Louisiana. “As we move forward to conserve millions of acres of waterfowl habitat, it's important to remember the mutually beneficial relationship between our nation's sportsmen and ducks. This legislation boosts conservation efforts, which in turn directly impacts the success of duck hunters in near and future hunting seasons.”

Since the federal duck stamp’s introduction in 1934, it has raised more than $750 million and has conserved more than 6 million acres of waterfowl habitat.

For more information, visit www.ducks.org.

Duck Stamp Act of 2014 passes Senate, awaits president’s signature

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – Dec. 2, 2014 – In a major win for wetlands and waterfowl conservation, the U.S. Senate passed the Duck Stamp Act of 2014 today. This critically important conservation legislation increases the cost of the federal duck stamp from $15 to $25, and now awaits President Obama’s signature.

“With the assistance of Sen. David Vitter and his leadership in helping pass the Duck Stamp Act of 2014, much-needed funding has been secured for wetlands and waterfowl conservation,” said Ducks Unlimited CEO Dale Hall. “The additional duck stamp funding provided by waterfowl hunters and other conservationists will not only conserve critical waterfowl habitat, but will also help ensure the future of our waterfowling traditions.”

Since 1991 – the last time the price of the duck stamp was increased – its purchasing power has declined due to inflation and rising land costs. The Duck Stamp Act of 2014 would build on this program’s long tradition of helping to conserve vital waterfowl habitat across America, especially in the Prairie Pothole Region, one of the continent’s most important production areas.

“This is huge news for conservation and duck hunters,” said Sen. Vitter of Louisiana. “As we move forward to conserve millions of acres of waterfowl habitat, it's important to remember the mutually beneficial relationship between our nation's sportsmen and ducks. This legislation boosts conservation efforts, which in turn directly impacts the success of duck hunters in near and future hunting seasons.”

Since the federal duck stamp’s introduction in 1934, it has raised more than $750 million and has conserved more than 6 million acres of waterfowl habitat.

For more information, visit www.ducks.org.

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Avery Outdoors Migration Reports

Migration Reports
For the week of December 1-5, 2014

Rocky Mountain:
Name:  Bill Schaefer
Date: 1/18/15
Location: Western Colorado
Weather: Warm, clear, sunny is the story here! Some rain last week due to warm conditions never turned into snow.  Since then, daytime conditions have been sunny and highs have reached the upper 40’s and low 50’s.  This seems to have geese feeding consistently in the morning and afternoon.  Most bodies of water froze solid during the end of December and the majority of waterfowl have resorted to roosting on the Colorado River.  This week’s forecast shows no sign of significant temperature drops or further precipitation.   
Snow Cover: None
Water Conditions: Smaller bodies of water are completely frozen with medium/large bodies mostly frozen.  Warmer daytime temps have allowed for some thawing on these larger bodies. Ice flows and build-up on the Colorado River has receded due to warmer daytime temps.  Canada geese seem to be primarily roosting on the river at night and certain groups will loaf on ice or any open water on larger lakes/ponds during the day.  
Feeding Conditions: More cornfields were harvested this week with the dry weather allowing farmers access to combine fields.  With the arrival of the last week of the season, no snow cover and plentiful sources of food should sustain the large number of Canada geese that are in the area. Some groups of birds continue to graze on a variety of diets including: corn, alfalfa, and winter wheat however, most birds seem to prefer corn and winter wheat.  Ducks seem to be focusing feeding efforts primarily in the evenings, depending on weather conditions that day and most fly out to feed at sunset.
Species and Numbers: This year’s largest concentration of canada geese are currently here with numbers locally estimated at approximately 3 – 5 thousand. Mallards were scarce during the cold snap around the holidays but, with warmer temps arriving, a reverse migration seems to have taken place due to an influx of ducks observed during the past week.
Migrations: The recent cold period of snow and single digit daily high temperatures did not seem to affect overall goose numbers as food sources remained readily available.  Another recent influx of Canada geese has been observed with an increase in temperatures and melting of snow cover.  The last week has produced “spring like” temperatures and with that an influx of mallards has been observed which, could be indicative of a reverse migration.  Large flocks of sandhill cranes were observed migrating north, another indication of reverse migration and unseasonably warm conditions.   
Season Stage: Currently we are in the late season.  Hunting looks optimistic going into the last week of the 2014-2015 waterfowl season due to mild temps, open water, plenty of food sources, and significant bird numbers.    
Hunting Report: Warming conditions have allowed birds to fly earlier and feed throughout the day, sometimes twice daily.  Geese seem especially accustomed to feeding throughout the whole day during overcast, snowy, or rainy days but, the past week has not produced these conditions. Decoying birds has been difficult on still days but, periodic wind and overcast conditions has helped much.  Geese seem to be feeding in an array of food sources depending on availability and weather conditions but hunting in corn has produced good results.  

Name:  Tailor Sponcey      
Date: 1-20-15
Location: Twin Falls, Idaho
Weather: Temperatures were picked up to the 40’s and 50’s over the weekend.
Snow Cover: 2 inches of snow accumulation is some areas but most has melted.
Water Conditions: Most small ponds and tributaries of the Snake River are frozen so birds are concentrated to the river.
Feeding Conditions: Feed fields are mostly being used.
Species and Numbers: Mallard, widgeon, and diver numbers are high as well as Canada geese.
Migrations: All migrators have arrived.
Season Stage: 1 week left of the general season.
Hunting Report: Hunting has been good with the snow cover and diver hunting on the river is excellent.

Name:  David Harper         
Date: 1/20/2015
Location: Jerome, Idaho
Weather: Temperatures have bounced back and forth between the mid 30’s to the upper 40’s during the day. Overnight temperatures are keeping most still water frozen as well as smaller creeks. Storms over the previous weekend brought about snow and rain mixed together. We are climbing in temperature toward the end of this week.
Snow Cover: Snow around the valley is varied between locations and can be as much as 4 inches in places.
Water Conditions: The Snake River remains open in the valley but many smaller waters are frozen still.
Feeding Conditions: The fields are being used heavily by dabblers and geese. Canada geese have been feeding heavily in green fields where they have shown through the snow and then snow covered cornfields. Mallards, Pintails, and Wigeon can all be found in corn right now.
Species and Numbers: All duck and goose numbers are high with even some snow geese and specks being seen.
Migrations: Birds were gained last week and seem to be sticking around.
Season Stage: Season for ducks and Canada geese close the 23rd of January; With Specks extending another month and Snows into March.
Hunting Report: Diver hunting on the Snake River is very good right now and some dabbler hunting can be very productive if the right places are found. Canada hunting can be hit and miss depending on location. Most birds are pretty call and decoy shy right now though.
Gossip:  Specklebelly geese and snow geese are starting to show up in the Valley.

 

Pacific:
Name:  Allen Riggs
Date: 1-18-15
Location: Metaline, WA
Weather: Temps have turned warmer with highs in the upper 30s and lows in the upper 20s. Snow is turning slushy and rain is expected
Snow Cover: 7-9 inches with levels diminishing as temperatures rise and rain moves in
Water Conditions: Pend Oreille River levels are low, water is flowing freely. Lakes and ponds remain frozen
Feeding Conditions: Birds continue to feed in the river as fields remain snowed in
Species and Numbers: Canada goose numbers are low; puddle duck numbers are lower than average but divers are becoming numerous
Migrations: Divers continue to show up in large flocks
Season Stage: Last week of the season – ends on the 25th
Hunting Report: Hunters continue to struggle for geese on the river; diver duck hunting is going well

Name:  Kent Contreras
Date: 1-20-2015
Location: Newport, WA.
Weather:  Mixed bag last week with snow showers and a slight cooling trend. This week’s forecasts show more of the same. Partly sunny skies with morning fog. Temps will remain mild with highs in the 30's and lows in the upper 20's
Snow Cover: Snow hit the area again last weekend giving us a couple more inches on the valley floor. Total coverage now is about 6 inches
Water Conditions: Water levels continue to fluctuate as the dams release and hold backwater
Feeding Conditions: Feeding conditions are poor due to the snow.  Birds have to feed near the shorelines
Species and Numbers: Those that are staying in the area are big Canada geese, divers and some puddle ducks. The biggest population of birds in the area is the diver species with some larger flocks of widgeon. Bufflehead, golden eye, ring necked and lesser scaup are rafting up on the river. Goose numbers seem to have dropped
Migrations: Looks like the divers have started to show up; all other bird numbers have leveled off
Season Stage: This is the last week of the waterfowl season – ends on the 25th
Hunting Report: Hunted the weekend and was successful with mixed bags. Ring Necks, Redheads, Lesser Scaup, Widgeon, a few Mallards, Canvasbacks and even a Gadwall were harvested. Only two more weekends before it's time to put things away!
Gossip:   Hearing good reports out of the Columbia Basin area and Tri-Cities

Name:  Travis Lyle
Date:  1-19-15
Location: Western NV
Weather:  60’s for a high, and mid to low in the 30’s. 
Snow Cover: Well we’ve gone from cold to above average temps for highs.  60’s and not much snow to talk about.  Not looking good as of now
Water Conditions: Bad.  Water levels have come down and there’s no end in sight, with above average temps water is going down
Feeding Conditions: Its’ the same as the water, little to none.  Been seeing some plots of widgeon grass floating around in a few areas
Species and Numbers:  Ducks have moved on.  Not much out there right now. Snows are returning and bunch of swans show back up.  Not much for ducks.
Migrations:  The reverse migration is starting now
Season Stage:  Got one more weekend
Hunting Report:  Been slow for some and hot for others. Need to scout
Gossip:  Real slow out there

 

Central:
Name: Kirk Steffensen

Date: January 20, 2015

Location: Lincoln, NE

Weather: Unseasonable warm weather continues with daytime highs in the mid-to-upper 40’s and overnight lows around freezing. 

Snow Cover: Nope

Water Conditions: Everything is frozen but diminishing quickly.  Some open water around but not much.

Feeding Conditions: Good, all fields are open.

Species and Numbers: Good number of geese in the area and everything is spreading out with the warmer weather.

Migrations: Reverse migration occurring, pickup new birds on Saturday.

Season Stage: Duck season closed in the eastern half of the state.  Goose seasons are open statewide.

Hunting Report: Tough with the warmer weather as birds are leaving city limits. 

 

Name: Jared Shepard       

Date: 01/20/15

Location: Scottsbluff, NE

Weather: Warm weather is sticking around! Temps this week are expected to stay in the mid 40’s with overnight lows down in the upper teens. 

Snow Cover: We currently have 1-3 inches of snow on the ground.

Water Conditions: The water level is stable in the river and at a good depth and speed for hunting. The river is flowing smoothly!

Feeding Conditions: Lots of corn, beans and alfalfa are available for the ducks and geese. Feeding conditions have improved drastically with all the melting snow.

Species and Numbers: Duck and goose numbers have doubled over the past week! Great numbers of mallards and all sizes of geese can be found in the area.

Migrations: A brilliant reverse migration started this past weekend and continues as I type….

Season Stage: Only 5 days remain in duck season and approximately three weeks left to hunt dark geese. Light goose season is closed but will reopen January 24th.

Hunting Report: Good reports of field mallards east and north of Scottsbluff and good reports of geese being shot all over the county!

Gossip: Lots of gossip about the returning birds…

 

Mississippi:
Name: Richard Shamla
Date: 01-22-15
Location: Clara City MN
Weather: Daytime highs getting up into the teens and twenties for this week. 
Snow Cover: Light snowfall last night resulting in appx 1 inch.
Water Conditions: Mostly all water is frozen except the river and a goose hole on Lac Qui Parle Lake.
Feeding Conditions: What is left of the geese are feeding on the refuge in cornfields.
Species and Numbers:  Very few geese remain.
Migrations: None
Season Stage: Closed
Hunting Report: None
Gossip: Ice Fishing has increased as the temps raised this past week.

Name:  Greg Owens
Date: Jan 20 2015
Location: Rochester, MN
Weather: About normal for this time of year.
Snow Cover: about 5”
Water Conditions:  Everything is frozen up except the rivers through town.
Feeding Conditions:  There is still plenty of food around for the birds that are still in town. 
Species and Numbers:  We have quite a few Ducks and Geese hanging out around town. And with no hunting pressure, the birds that are still here will probably stay here through the winter.
Migrations:  None noted.
Season Stage: The season is closed now.
Hunting Report: N/A.
Gossip:  Ice fishing is really starting to heat up.

Name: Justin Weber
Date: 1/20/2015
Location: Cottage Grove, Wisconsin
Weather: Partly Sunny with temperatures ranging from 20-40 degrees
Snow Cover: none
Water Conditions: With warm front ice is starting to melt and there is more open water available for bird to use.
Feeding Conditions: Birds are taking advantage of the unseasonably warm weather and feeding in cornfields twice a day.
Species and Numbers: Seeing large numbers of geese as well as a decent number of mallards.
Migrations: Most birds left are holding tight right now. With open water and food there is no reason for them to move south.
Season Stage: End of Season
Hunting Report: Hunting season is over.
Gossip: Early Spring?

Name:  Shaun Patrick
Date: 1-21-15
Location: Troy MO
Weather: lows in the 30’s highs in the 50’s
Snow Cover: N/A
Water Conditions: Small water is locked up still, big water partially open; rivers are now open with chunk ice in some areas
Feeding Conditions: Good
Species and Numbers: Canada Geese, Snow Geese
Migrations: With the above average temps, we have seen some Canada geese pushing back from the south, as well the start of some snows moving back through from the south.
Season Stage: Late goose season, Spring Conservation starts Feb 1
Hunting Report: Hunting in the area has been difficult for most. Birds will use a field for one day, then move to another the next, there is no pattern.
Gossip:  Ready to start shooting White geese!!!

 

Atlantic:
Name:  Kevin Addy
Date: January 20, 2015
Location: Reading, PA     
Weather: Lows in the 20’s and highs in the 30’s
Snow Cover: None but a dusting to a couple inches expected tomorrow
Water Conditions: All small water is locked up and some of the bigger water has started to thaw. The river is breaking up and the ice flow is strong in sections.
Feeding Conditions: Decent – most cornfields have already been fed out. The cover crops still look good but the birds would rather be on corn most days.
Species and Numbers: Duck numbers have dropped a little while the Canada numbers remain the same.
Migrations: None besides birds moving around the area when conditions change.
Season Stage:  Ducks closed 1/15 and AP goose remains open until 1/26.
Hunting Report: The last week of duck was real good. Conditions were perfect for ducks. The geese are a stale and there is a lot of pressure. Without weather you work for a limit.
Gossip: Wow, the season went by quick!

Name: Mike Bard      
Date: January 20, 2015
Location: Rockville Center, NY
Weather: Temps the past couple days have been increasing
Snow Cover: None
Water Conditions: A few launches in the area are iced in, along with some areas back in the marshes, but a lot of open water remains.
Feeding Conditions: Good
Species and Numbers: Average numbers of brant and black ducks
Migrations: No noticeable increases - Most of the birds that will winter here are already here for the year
Season Stage: Late
Hunting Report: Brant, black duck and diver hunting has been good
Gossip:  None

Name:  Sean M. Fritzges
Date: 18 January 2015
Location: Bel Air, MD        
Weather: COLD!!
Snow Cover: None at this time. 
Water Conditions: Bay tide levels very low due to recent strong winds pushing the water out of the bay.
Feeding Conditions:  Canada geese feeding in cut corn and soybean fields.
Species and Numbers:  Canada geese numbers increasing with the recent cold temps up north.
Migrations:  Large numbers of new birds in our area of north Harford Co.
Season Stage:  AP season second split began 16 December. Season closes 4 February. Youth Day 7 February.
Gossip: Lots of goose hunters in my area finally getting into the geese for the first time this season. Hoping the geese keep coming and the cold weather continues!!!

Name:  Marshall Starkey
Date: 1/20/15
Location: Essex, MD
Weather: Temps are a little above average this week and a trace of snow is possible on Wednesday.
Snow Cover: none
Water Conditions: Some small ponds are frozen but the rivers and bay remain wide open.
Feeding Conditions: Cut agricultural fields and impoundments that have recently flooded are holding birds.
Species and Numbers: Canada goose numbers bumped up a little last week. Snow goose numbers seem very high.
Migrations: A few new birds seem to have moved in last week.
Season Stage: The last split of the AP season is now open.
Hunting Report: Evening hunts have been the ticket the past few weeks.
Gossip: The geese seem very localized right now as opposed to spread out as in years past. The gunning is either great or very slow.

Name:  J David Weidner
Date: 1-20-15
Location: New Jersey
Weather: Cold
Snow Cover: 1-3 inches expected
Water Conditions: Excellent
Feeding Conditions: Good
Species and Numbers: Geese and ducks
Migrations:  None observed
Season Stage: Late season
Hunting Report:  The only duck zone open is coastal and things are going fairly well there.  Ice in some pockets of the bay.  Weather isn’t exactly waterfowl hunting friends – clear and bluebird with little wind.  Goose hunting continues to be consistent, but birds are now moving onto grass.
Gossip:  None

Name: Bryn Witmier
Date: 1/20/2015
Location: Strausstown, PA
Weather:  Pretty close to what late January should be.  Expecting snow tomorrow and the weekend.
Snow Cover:  Not yet
Water Conditions:  Small water is locked up.  Bigger bodies are mostly frozen.
Feeding Conditions: Good
Species and Numbers:  Good amount of Canada geese and some snows.
Migrations: None.
Season Stage:  Canada goose season ends Saturday.
Hunting Report:  Plenty of geese around.  Plenty of pressure too.
Gossip:  Snow goose season will be here before you know it.

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Louisville Slugger, Realtree Collaborate for Personalized Camo Bats

LOUISVILLE, KY - Louisville Slugger, the Official Bat of Major League Baseball® and the number one name in bats for 130 years, has an exclusive new collaboration with Realtree®, the leader in camouflage products for those who love the outdoors. It's the Realtree™ Camouflage Bat, and it makes an awesome gift because you can personalize it with a name or special message.

Each Realtree Camouflage Bat from Louisville Slugger is 34 inches long and is made from high grade maple. The bats are covered in Realtree Xtra® Green camo print, applied with a state of the art Hydrographic Finishing process that creates a durable high gloss finish. Louisville Slugger's Realtree camo bats are completed with precision laser engraving to create a beautiful and unique souvenir for any outdoorsman.

"Anyone who gets a personalized Realtree camo bat from Louisville Slugger is going to be proud to display it in their man cave, office, family room or den," said Louisville Slugger Director of Specialty Bat Sales Packy Page. "We've even heard guys say they can't wait to put their camo bat on their gun rack in their trucks. That'll be pretty cool to see."

Louisville Slugger is the expert when it comes to finding trees for making baseball bats. The storied company has made more than 100-million bats since it started in 1884.

"We appreciate the passion so many people have for being outdoors because being in the forest is in our DNA at Louisville Slugger," Page said. "So, with the millions of people who hunt, fish, hike, and just love being outdoors, this collaboration with Realtree was a natural step for us at Louisville Slugger."

Personalized Realtree Camouflage Bats from Louisville Slugger are available at www.sluggergifts.com and sell for $89.99, including standard shipping. Camo bat orders ship within 3 to 5 business days. Orders must be placed by December 10 to receive in time for the Holidays.

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St. Croix Triumph X...Just Call it the “Cool Tool"

Just Call it the “Cool Tool”

Triumph X backs its sporty, confident looks with the performance you expect from St. Croix

Park Falls, WI (November 24, 2014) – Even in fishing, style sells. In a sport where product performance should be the ultimate measure – even the deciding factor in sealing the deal at the cash register – looks do matter. Regrettably, some rod makers prey on this premise by putting “lipstick on the pig.”

Fortunately, there are proud, legacy manufacturers like St. Croix Rod who embrace the coolness factor while never succumbing to cheapness.

While visually alluring, even radical in appearance, St. Croix’s new Triumph X rod series owns its price-range in quality and performance. But long before the vibrant, airbrushed colors visually distinguish Triumph X from surrounding rods on the rack, technology and decades of advanced St. Croix engineering underpin its stature.

Beneath the striking burnt-orange and purplish-black façade is an SCII graphite blank that begs to accompany a more expensive rod. But at a hundred bucks, Triumph X is a triumph in blank construction at a reasonable price.

Component wise, the Triumph X features an EVA split-grip handle – again, a feat for the dollars. Split-grip practitioners embrace the progressive design’s balanced casting, comfort and lessened overall weight. Triumph X users will appreciate said benefits, which were once reserved for more expensive rods.

Fuji® DPS or ECS reel seat with black hood(s) complement the blank cosmetics while providing all-day casting comfort. Hard aluminum-oxide guides set in distinctive black frames support casting distance while holding up to the rigors of the sport. And this while precision-wound thread-wraps are safely situated beneath two coats of Flex Coat slow-cure finish.

All 12 spinning and casting rods in the Triumph X series are cultured for outstanding strength, sensitivity and hook-setting power. And amongst those dozen members are select rods for targeting bass, walleyes, pike, panfish and whatever else swims across your path.

Backed by a 5-year warranty and St. Croix’s celebrated Superstar Service, your affordably priced Triumph X rod doubles as a capital investment.

The Triumph X series is designed and engineered in Park Falls, Wisconsin, and handcrafted in St. Croix’s advanced facility in Fresnillo, Mexico. They retail for $90 to $100.

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Compact units pack a huge punch, offer anglers widescreen color display and pro features at an equally attractive price point EUFAULA, AL. (November 21, 2014) – Continuing with the trend of offering anglers more features at a compelling value, Humminbird® is proud to announce the launch of HELIX™, a family of compact-format fishfinders that feature a best-in-class, widescreen color display and powerful, professional-grade features. For years, many anglers have been fishing in a box, limited to fish- and structure-viewing on a screen that doesn’t fully capture the breadth of the underwater landscape – landscape being the operative word. Hence, Humminbird’s recent shift to a 5-inch diagonal 800H x 480V screen 256-color TFT display that recalls the 16:9 aspect ratio of HDTV, but in a more compact format. “Over the years, anglers have told us that they love our 800 and 900 Series units because of the screen orientation. Especially for technologies like our patented Side Imaging™, the landscape orientation maximizes the number of horizontal pixels for optimal detail and easy viewing,” says Humminbird Brand Manager, Jeff Kolodzinski. For first-time electronics buyers, the getting has never been so good. Anglers on limited budgets now have access to incredible fish-finding features with minimal investment. HELIX offers the highest resolution of any fishfinder in their price category. “These aren’t just amazingly priced units, they are amazing units at any price,” says Humminbird Sr. Product Manager, John Luther. MEET THE FAMILY The HELIX family currently comprises five models to meet the individual needs of anglers and boaters. All units feature X-Press Menu System keypad control, 800H x 480V 5-inch 256-color TFT display, and allow for gimbal mounting, or in-dash mounting with optional kit. International models support 200/50 kHz. Optional 50 kHz transducers are available for extreme deep-water use. HELIX 5 SONAR Designed for the angler/boater who requires DualBeam PLUS Sonar only. Included XNT 9 20 T transducer with 200/83 kHz frequencies for 20- and 60-degree coverage, respectively. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. 1500 feet depth capability. *Also available in a portable model, HELIX 5 SONAR PT (Portable), which includes Humminbird shuttle and case. HELIX 5 DI Designed for the angler who requires DualBeam PLUS Sonar and Down Imaging®. Included XNT 9 DI T transducer features 455/800/200/455 kHz frequencies for 16-, 28-, 45- and 75-degree coverage. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. 600 feet depth-capable sonar; Down Imaging, 350 feet. HELIX 5 SONAR – GPS Offers DualBeam PLUS Sonar and GPS chartplotting with internal GPS receiver for 2,500 waypoints, 45 routes, 50 tracks and 20,000 waypoints. Includes Humminbird UniMap base maps and is compatible with Humminbird LakeMaster® charts, including AutoChart™. Navionics® Gold/HotMaps™ compatible. Included XNT 9 20 T transducer with 200/83 kHz frequencies for 20- and 60-degree coverage, respectively. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. GPS speed included. 1500 feet depth capability. *Also available in a portable model, HELIX 5 SONAR – GPS PT (Portable), which includes Humminbird shuttle and case. HELIX 5 DI – GPS Functionality includes DualBeam PLUS Sonar, GPS chartplotting with internal GPS receiver and Down Imaging®. Includes Humminbird UniMap base maps and is compatible with Humminbird LakeMaster® charts, including AutoChart™. Navionics® Gold/HotMaps™ compatible. Included XNT 9 DI T transducer features 455/800/200/455 kHz frequencies for 16-, 28-, 45- and 75-degree coverage. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. GPS speed included. 600 feet depth-capable sonar; Down Imaging®, 350 feet. HELIX 5 SI – GPS The flagship unit of the HELIX family features DualBeam PLUS Sonar, GPS chartplotting with internal GPS receiver, Down Imaging®, and Side Imaging®. Includes Humminbird UniMap base maps and is compatible with Humminbird LakeMaster® charts, including AutoChart™ and AutoChart™ Pro. Navionics® Gold/HotMaps™ compatible. Included XNT 9 SI 180 T transducer features 200/83/455 kHz frequencies for 20-, 60-, and (2) 85-degree angles of coverage. Water surface temperature gauge built into transducer. GPS speed included. 1500 feet depth-capable sonar; Down Imaging®, 350 feet; Side imaging®, 100 feet, left and right. *Also available in the Kevin VanDam Signature Series as HELIX 5 SI – GPS KVD.
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Strike King Partners with Kemos in Walleye Market

Collierville, Tenn. (Dec. 11, 2014) – Strike King Lure Co. has recently began to intently focus on the growing walleye market. With the introduction of the all-new Walleye Elite line of products this past July, Strike King is investing heavily in research and development with the goal of delivering the same quality, value and performance that they’re products are known for in the bass and crappie world. In doing so, they are proud to announce their recent partnership of longtime walleye pro angler Tommy Kemos. “Our brand is constantly evolving. In that evolution, we are branching out into other genres of fishing that we’re passionate about. We did this successfully in crappie and now we’ve got our sights set on walleye,” remarks Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Doug Minor. “In order to produce top-notch products, you have to have top-notch knowledge. That’s what Tommy brings to the table. He knows walleye as well as anyone on the earth,” adds Minor. “I couldn’t be happier than to be with Strike King,” says Kemos who has won many national level events as well as Angler of the Year titles. “They are serious about building baits that help people catch fish and so am I. We’ve got a lot of big things in the works for walleye anglers,” Kemos states. For more information on the Walleye Elite products, please visit www.strikeking.com or your preferred fishing tackle retailer.
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PLANO REINVENTS THE PLASTIC ARROW BOX WITH THE ALL-NEW CROSSBOW MAX BOLT CASE AND ALL-NEW ARROW MAX CASE

Plano, IL (January 8, 2015) – Archers’ arrows are where you find them: a few in the bow case, six in the quiver, and a dozen in that cardboard thingy behind the door.  Specialized arrow tubes and plastic arrow cases see their share of action too, but have their limitations.  Most arrow tubes provide great crush resistance, but access is limited to a narrow opening at one end.  Plastic box-type cases provide better access and more efficient storage, but may not be as strong as tubes.

 

Archers seeking innovative storage and transport solutions for their arrows or crossbow bolts should check out the all-new Model 112500 Arrow Max Case and Model 112400 Crossbow Max Bolt Case from Plano, the company helping outdoor enthusiasts keep their valuable gear organized and protected for over 60 years.

These lightweight and affordable plastic cases share an all-new innovative design that maximizes access while providing unmatched rigidity and crush resistance.  Each case securely holds six fully-dressed arrows or bolts in rattle-free rubber grips, along with additional accessories like broadheads, field tips, extra fletching, cement, and broadhead wrenches.

 

Both cases utilize a carefully engineered shape creating a convex profile for superior strength.  An additional reinforcing grid inside the case and all lid sections further stiffens these cases and combats torque.  A unique three-piece vented lid design minimizes weight and provides maximum strength and security when the cases are closed and latched with the durable molded closures.

 

Arrow boxes hitch a ride wherever they fit.  Thanks to their low profile, these cases will fit inside many soft or hard bow or crossbow cases, but can also easily be attached to the outsides of duffels, packs, bow cases or ATVs with straps or bungee cords using their clever molded-in lashing slots.

Plano® Model 112400 Crossbow Max Bolt Case

  • Heavy-duty material
  • Durable “H” latch closures
  • Holds 6 crossbow bolts up to 23.75” long
  • Internal storage for small accessories
  • Integral slots to for lashing straps
  • Compact design measures 28” x 7.75” x 2”

MSRP $24.99

 

 

Plano® Model 112500 Arrow Max Case

  • Heavy-duty material
  • Durable “H” latch closures
  • Holds 6 arrows up to 32.75” long
  • Internal storage for small accessories
  • Integral slots to for lashing straps
  • Compact design measures 37” x 7.75” x 2”

MSRP $24.99

 

 

Repurpose your old arrow boxes and recycle the cardboard thingy. Affordable, durable, practical and high-tech, the all new Model 112500 Arrow Max Case and Model 112400 Crossbow Max Bolt Case from Plano represent the freshest thinking in arrow/bolt storage and transport available today.  Learn more at www.planomolding.com.

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Tenzing Heavy Hauler Sling

Plano, IL (January 7, 2015) – An outdoor lifestyle is physically demanding.  Whether laboring around the farm, ranch or homestead or recreating in your vast outdoor playground, you’ll move a staggering quantity of gear and supplies in your lifetime.  This tonnage can take its toll on your back.  And if you aren’t careful, the outdoors lifestyle you treasure can come to a premature end.

Don’t trade your tomorrows for today.  Get the job done, but lift those loads easier and more safely using Tenzing technology. 

 

The new Tenzing TZ SS15 Sherpa Sling is the ultimate carryall load sling – a relatively simple idea executed with maximum impact through Tenzing’s brand-defining engineering and attention to detail.  The secret?  The Sherpa Sling takes heavy loads off the back and arms and distributes them among the stronger muscle groups in the legs, shoulders and core.

The Sherpa Sling is designed to comfortably tote light or heavy loads, as well as any difficult or awkward-to-carry item. Sure, it makes a great bow, crossbow or rifle sling, but the TZ SS15 Sherpa Sling comes into its own when carrying the hunter’s tree stands, climbing ladders, coolers, decoy bags and more.  Around the homestead, it’s the perfect tool for carrying propane tanks, firewood, hay bales… even laundry baskets. If you can secure the load with rope or any of the three included strap sets, the Sherpa Sling will carry it… easier and a lot more safely. The Tenzing TZ SS15 Sherpa Sling can attach to itself and be worn like a belt until its heavy lifting power is needed.  When pressed into duty, the Sherpa Sling can be worn over a single shoulder, or across the body, bandolier-style.

 

Tenzing has engineered and constructed the TZ SS15 Sherpa Sling with the same standard of care it gives to its industry-leading hunting packs, bird hunting vests and optics holsters.  The result is a product that is extremely comfortable to wear and will perform for a lifetime. 

 

The core of the Sherpa Sling is its 1-1/4-inch ballistic Nylon webbing strap, ensuring heavy lifting capability.  The middle section of the strap is covered with 2-3/4-inch wide, ¼-inch thick Neoprene, providing both grip and just the right amount of stretch for amazing comfort.  This Neoprene section is finished in Realtree Xtra Spandex for additional comfort, durability and concealment in hunting applications.  Both ends of the Sherpa Sling accept Hypalon straps with high strength Velcro closures to secure your chosen cargo.  Three sizes of straps are provided, but rope, paracord or even ratchet straps can also be used in a pinch to attach particularly large or unwieldy loads.  Duraflex hardware completes the list of this small wonder’s high-end components.

 

 

Tenzing TZ SS15 Sherpa Sling

  • 1-1/4-inch wide primary strap webbing
  • 2-3/4-inch wide x 1/4-inch thick non-slip Neoprene shoulder sling covered in Realtree Xtra Spandex
  • 8, 10 and 12-inch Hypalon carrying straps with Velcro closures to secure a variety of loads
  • Duraflex hardware
  • MSRP: $49.99

 

Tenzing products are renowned for their ability to comfortably carry heavy loads, and their new, workmanlike TZ SS15 Sherpa Sling is sure to broaden that reputation.  So start playing it safe by playing it smart.  Take care of your back by letting the new Tenzing Sherpa Sling take over your heavy lifting duties… and start adding many good years to your outdoor lifestyle.

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Aqua-Vu reconnects retinas with Traditions Media
Crosslake, MN. (January 14, 2015) – Even as legions of its ‘underwater eyes’ search for sportfish beneath frozen and watery surfaces, marine optics leader Aqua-Vu continues its commitment to innovation and excellence in the category it created nearly twenty years ago. Working closely with the outdoors-focused marketing / public relations team at Traditions Media, Aqua-Vu has experienced exceptional sales growth during the past two years. Consequently, the like-minded businesses recently renewed their partnership, striving to fortify worldwide awareness of Aqua-Vu’s entertaining and educational fishing technologies. “With the veteran guidance of Traditions Media, we’ve seen significant growth in retail sales and consumer popularity of our underwater viewing systems,” says Ben Gibbs, President of Aqua-Vu parent company Outdoors Insight, Inc. Along with expanded sales and brand awareness, Gibbs points to new product entries such as Bio-Lume™, an economical yet powerful fish-attracting light system whose recent introduction has spurred quick and significant sales among northern and southern anglers alike. Likewise, says Gibbs, Aqua-Vu continues to grow its Micro® Underwater Camera series, with affordable newer systems like the Micro 5c and TM (trolling motor) Cam. He also hints at several tantalizing video technologies the company plans to release in 2015 and beyond. “I’ll just say this: Folks will soon be able to monitor their fishing spots and document their outings via video like never before.” Traditions Media president Noel Vick notes his company’s zeal for communicating fishing-focused messages. “Our business is about partnering with leading edge fishing companies who share our passion for the pursuit. Aqua-Vu is ‘all in’ on innovation. Just as our other kindred spirits at St. Croix, Humminbird, Plano/Frabill and our other partners continue their traditions of imagination and inspiration. It’s the same approach we take when crafting stories—innovation, passion and unapologetic imagination.” “We’re experts at building innovative, high quality, high tech fishing tools,” Gibbs affirms. “The media professionals at Traditions Media are gifted communicators, telling our story to the trade and consumers in fun and compelling ways. The alliance between our two companies has been a natural, as we anticipate an exciting future for the Aqua-Vu brand.”
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2015 Wild Game Suppers

Brookside Baptist Church, 3993 Miss. 302-East near Olive Branch (Feb. 8); featuring recording artist Dallas Holm; Sportsman Dinner; 5:30 p.m; pastor Marvin L. Tharnish.


Kirk Baptist, 6365 Raleigh/LaGrange Road in Collierville (Feb. 21); Men/Boys dinner; 5 pm.; Door Prize; free, but everyone attending brings game dish, chicken or vegetables; 854-5884; speaker – Larry Rea of Outdoors with Larry Rea on ESPN 790-AM.


Hope Baptist Church Men & Boys Wild-Game Dinner, 6800 Centerhill Road, Olive Branch (Feb. 28); featured speaker crappie angler Robbie Jordan, point leader for Memphis chapter of Legacy Outfitters.


Longview Heights Baptist Church Beast Feast, 4501 Goodman Road in Olive Branch (Feb. 28); featuring John Croyle, founder and executive director of Big Oak Ranch in Springville, Alabama; defensive end for the University of Alabama’s 1973 National Championship football team; free family expo from noon to 5 p.m.; Beast Feast tickets $10 for adults and $6 for children under 12 (dinner space is limited).


Trinity Baptist Church wild-game supper, 8899 Trinity Road in Cordova (March 5); speaker yet to be announced.


Bartlett Hills Baptist Church, 4641 Ellendale Road in Bartlett (March 7); speaker yet to be announced.


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